Title

Catastrophic Healthcare Spending in Tanzania

Poster Number

13B

Lead Author Major

Economics

Lead Author Status

5th year Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Michelle Amaral

Faculty Mentor Email

mamaral@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Economics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Few papers address the factors that affect a person's risk of reaching a catastrophic level of health spending. For less developed countries like Tanzania, with high levels of out of pocket health spending, determining the factors that affect risk is more important than comparing different countries’ percentage of citizens who are already at the catastrophic level. The data used was published by World Bank for their Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS), and was collected over a one-year period starting in October of 2008. This paper uses a Two-part Model to investigate which factors in the regression significantly affect the risk of catastrophic health spending. A Two-part Model allows the test to utilize all of the data collected rather than just using the data for the households that are at the catastrophic level. Estimations found three variables that significantly impact catastrophic payments in Tanzania. The variables; 1) age of the household head, 2) percentage of the household who saw a healthcare provider, and 3) percentage of the household who were hospitalized were all found to be statistically significant at the one-percent level. Future work might focus on combining this data with the other two years of the LSMS and comparing results with results from countries similar to Tanzania. This may provide policy makers with ideas of social safety nets that they can implement to help lower their citizen's risk of reaching catastrophic levels of health spending.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Catastrophic Healthcare Spending in Tanzania

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Few papers address the factors that affect a person's risk of reaching a catastrophic level of health spending. For less developed countries like Tanzania, with high levels of out of pocket health spending, determining the factors that affect risk is more important than comparing different countries’ percentage of citizens who are already at the catastrophic level. The data used was published by World Bank for their Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS), and was collected over a one-year period starting in October of 2008. This paper uses a Two-part Model to investigate which factors in the regression significantly affect the risk of catastrophic health spending. A Two-part Model allows the test to utilize all of the data collected rather than just using the data for the households that are at the catastrophic level. Estimations found three variables that significantly impact catastrophic payments in Tanzania. The variables; 1) age of the household head, 2) percentage of the household who saw a healthcare provider, and 3) percentage of the household who were hospitalized were all found to be statistically significant at the one-percent level. Future work might focus on combining this data with the other two years of the LSMS and comparing results with results from countries similar to Tanzania. This may provide policy makers with ideas of social safety nets that they can implement to help lower their citizen's risk of reaching catastrophic levels of health spending.