Title

The Analysis of Whistles by Context in Bottlenose Dolphins

Poster Number

10B

Lead Author Major

Pre-dentistry

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Biology

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Third Author Major

Pre-dentistry

Third Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Stacie Hooper

Faculty Mentor Email

shooper@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use whistles in different contexts in order to communicate with each other. Based on Morton’s motivational-structural rules describing the relationship between the structure of vocalizations and context (Morton, 1977), we hypothesized that dolphin whistles produced in aggressive contexts would be harsher and lower in frequency than whistles produced in affiliative contexts. We used whistles from two captive male infant dolphins and their mothers produced during aggressive and affiliative behaviors. Recordings were obtained through a hydrophone inserted into the tank while a human observer described the behavioral context of the whistles. We used Audacity software to isolate the whistles from the original recordings, and used Praat sound analysis software and customized scripts to extract quantitative measurements of whistle frequency, modulation, and duration.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

The Analysis of Whistles by Context in Bottlenose Dolphins

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use whistles in different contexts in order to communicate with each other. Based on Morton’s motivational-structural rules describing the relationship between the structure of vocalizations and context (Morton, 1977), we hypothesized that dolphin whistles produced in aggressive contexts would be harsher and lower in frequency than whistles produced in affiliative contexts. We used whistles from two captive male infant dolphins and their mothers produced during aggressive and affiliative behaviors. Recordings were obtained through a hydrophone inserted into the tank while a human observer described the behavioral context of the whistles. We used Audacity software to isolate the whistles from the original recordings, and used Praat sound analysis software and customized scripts to extract quantitative measurements of whistle frequency, modulation, and duration.