Title

Vaping and Ethnic Identity: an exploratory study

Poster Number

20B

Lead Author Major

Sociology

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ruth Lewis

Faculty Mentor Email

rlewis@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Sociology

Abstract/Artist Statement

China is the world's largest manufacturer and consumer of cigarettes in the world, smoking roughly 30% of the world's cigarettes. Yet, data from the United States census, CDC reports, and other major surveys show that the prevalence of smoking among Chinese Americans is considerably lower than the national average. While smoking is very common in China and intertwined into the nation's culture, cigarette smoking is becoming increasingly stigmatized in US culture. Previous studies have pointed to acculturation as the main avenue for change in smoking habits amongst recent Chinese immigrants. As cigarette smoking is becoming less common in the United States, e-cigarette use or "vaping" is becoming more prevalent, especially amongst younger people. The purpose of this literature review is to explore what is known about Chinese American involvement in the new United States vaping culture and attempt to identify research gaps as well as suggest further research topics.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

Vaping and Ethnic Identity: an exploratory study

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

China is the world's largest manufacturer and consumer of cigarettes in the world, smoking roughly 30% of the world's cigarettes. Yet, data from the United States census, CDC reports, and other major surveys show that the prevalence of smoking among Chinese Americans is considerably lower than the national average. While smoking is very common in China and intertwined into the nation's culture, cigarette smoking is becoming increasingly stigmatized in US culture. Previous studies have pointed to acculturation as the main avenue for change in smoking habits amongst recent Chinese immigrants. As cigarette smoking is becoming less common in the United States, e-cigarette use or "vaping" is becoming more prevalent, especially amongst younger people. The purpose of this literature review is to explore what is known about Chinese American involvement in the new United States vaping culture and attempt to identify research gaps as well as suggest further research topics.