Title

Examining the effects of bait type on diversity patterns in tropical rain forest butterflies.

Poster Number

09B

Lead Author Major

3+3 pre-dentistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biology

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Biology

Third Author Status

Junior

Fourth Author Major

Biology

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Fifth Author Major

Department of Biological sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ryan Hill

Faculty Mentor Email

rhill@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Lowland tropical rain forest insect communities represent the pinnacle of diversity on Earth. Studies of these communities have revealed marked stratification between the canopy and understory, as well as variation across seasons. Some of the most thorough documentation of these patterns has come from standardized bait trapping studies of “fruit feeding nymphalid” butterflies. Historically, rotten banana has been used as a bait owing to its ubiquity in tropical countries worldwide. However, it is well-known that nymphalid butterflies are attracted to other sources, such as other rotting fruits, dung and carrion, and these additional nutrient sources have not been explored in a standardized manner. Because patterns observed from bait studies depend on attraction to the bait used, it is important to investigate whether bait identity alters perceived diversity patterns. Therefore, in order to test if spatial and temporal patterns differ by bait type, a comprehensive trap study in the lowland wet rain forest of Northeast Costa Rica using two different baits, rotten shrimp and rotten banana was conducted. A total of 32 trapping sites with paired canopy and understory traps at each were spread among three habitats: valley, ridge and edge/secondary. Studying the potential effects of bait type on diversity patterns not only gives insight into how robust the patterns are, but also clarifies food preferences within and between species, which can be useful in further studies to trap specific species.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Examining the effects of bait type on diversity patterns in tropical rain forest butterflies.

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Lowland tropical rain forest insect communities represent the pinnacle of diversity on Earth. Studies of these communities have revealed marked stratification between the canopy and understory, as well as variation across seasons. Some of the most thorough documentation of these patterns has come from standardized bait trapping studies of “fruit feeding nymphalid” butterflies. Historically, rotten banana has been used as a bait owing to its ubiquity in tropical countries worldwide. However, it is well-known that nymphalid butterflies are attracted to other sources, such as other rotting fruits, dung and carrion, and these additional nutrient sources have not been explored in a standardized manner. Because patterns observed from bait studies depend on attraction to the bait used, it is important to investigate whether bait identity alters perceived diversity patterns. Therefore, in order to test if spatial and temporal patterns differ by bait type, a comprehensive trap study in the lowland wet rain forest of Northeast Costa Rica using two different baits, rotten shrimp and rotten banana was conducted. A total of 32 trapping sites with paired canopy and understory traps at each were spread among three habitats: valley, ridge and edge/secondary. Studying the potential effects of bait type on diversity patterns not only gives insight into how robust the patterns are, but also clarifies food preferences within and between species, which can be useful in further studies to trap specific species.