Title

Collection and Analysis of Proteins in Corydoras duplicareus Venom

Poster Number

02B

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Eric Thomas

Faculty Mentor Email

e_thomas@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Erik Wictor

Graduate Student Mentor Email

e_wictor@pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

We are developing methods for collecting venom and studying its chemical properties to better understand its mode of action and its function in the genus of fish Corydoras. Stressful handling of C. duplicareus was induced by placing them in a plastic bag to simulate commercial handling. Within minutes, the water turned cloudy, indicative of venom secretion. Signs of self-poisoning were also evident when fish showed reduced vital signs further confirming venom secretion.

For studying the anatomical location of Corydoras venom gland, C. sterbai was dissected due to it being the closest relative to C. duplicareus, and also higher availability of this fish species around our area. C. sterbai venom gland was found proximal to an opening where secreted venom may empty through.

While the chemistry of the venom is unknown, analysis tests indicate that it is most likely a protein compound. Samples of C. duplicareus venom solution were lyophilized to concentrate the venom, then analyzed for total protein content using the Bradford Stanford Assay. This test indicated a relatively concentrated sample of protein. Concentrated samples were then subject to SDS-PAGE for preliminary protein separation and compared to control water. The gel revealed multiple stained bands for each lane loaded with venom sample indicating that secretions from C. duplicareus were present.

The cloudiness of the water, location of C. sterbai venom gland, and detection of proteins in the Bradford test and SDS-PAGE gel provides concrete evidence that chemicals have been released.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Collection and Analysis of Proteins in Corydoras duplicareus Venom

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

We are developing methods for collecting venom and studying its chemical properties to better understand its mode of action and its function in the genus of fish Corydoras. Stressful handling of C. duplicareus was induced by placing them in a plastic bag to simulate commercial handling. Within minutes, the water turned cloudy, indicative of venom secretion. Signs of self-poisoning were also evident when fish showed reduced vital signs further confirming venom secretion.

For studying the anatomical location of Corydoras venom gland, C. sterbai was dissected due to it being the closest relative to C. duplicareus, and also higher availability of this fish species around our area. C. sterbai venom gland was found proximal to an opening where secreted venom may empty through.

While the chemistry of the venom is unknown, analysis tests indicate that it is most likely a protein compound. Samples of C. duplicareus venom solution were lyophilized to concentrate the venom, then analyzed for total protein content using the Bradford Stanford Assay. This test indicated a relatively concentrated sample of protein. Concentrated samples were then subject to SDS-PAGE for preliminary protein separation and compared to control water. The gel revealed multiple stained bands for each lane loaded with venom sample indicating that secretions from C. duplicareus were present.

The cloudiness of the water, location of C. sterbai venom gland, and detection of proteins in the Bradford test and SDS-PAGE gel provides concrete evidence that chemicals have been released.