Title

The Gipson Socialization Center: A Chance to Learn While Teaching

Poster Number

19A

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Carolynn Kohn

Faculty Mentor Email

ckohn@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Gipson Socialization Center is located on Pine Street in Stockton California. This center provides a safe place for adults diagnosed with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, to interact, socialize, take rehabilitation classes, and learn job-specific skills for eventual job placements. The classes are based on empirically supported treatments, specifically, social skills modules developed by Liberman et al. (2001). The classes are designed to be administered in small groups, with one or two teachers leading the class. Wallace et. al found that these psychoeducational modules, when taught in small groups, significantly improved the social skills in patients up to a one year follow up (1992). I interned at the Gipson Center and taught Anger Management, Friendship and Intimacy, Symptom Management, and the Medication Education classes. I assessed client learning and understanding through worksheets distributed during the lecture, as well as verbal responses given by the clients. I took progress notes on clients after each class to help their social workers’ see if they are improving through the group classes. Teaching classes at the Gipson Socialization Center gave me skills to positively interact and communicate with adults with mental illnesses.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

The Gipson Socialization Center: A Chance to Learn While Teaching

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The Gipson Socialization Center is located on Pine Street in Stockton California. This center provides a safe place for adults diagnosed with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, to interact, socialize, take rehabilitation classes, and learn job-specific skills for eventual job placements. The classes are based on empirically supported treatments, specifically, social skills modules developed by Liberman et al. (2001). The classes are designed to be administered in small groups, with one or two teachers leading the class. Wallace et. al found that these psychoeducational modules, when taught in small groups, significantly improved the social skills in patients up to a one year follow up (1992). I interned at the Gipson Center and taught Anger Management, Friendship and Intimacy, Symptom Management, and the Medication Education classes. I assessed client learning and understanding through worksheets distributed during the lecture, as well as verbal responses given by the clients. I took progress notes on clients after each class to help their social workers’ see if they are improving through the group classes. Teaching classes at the Gipson Socialization Center gave me skills to positively interact and communicate with adults with mental illnesses.