Title

Wildlife Crossing Overpass Project

Lead Author Major

Civil Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Civil Engineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Civil Engineering

Third Author Status

5th year Senior

Fourth Author Major

Civil Engineering

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Camilla Saviz

Faculty Mentor Email

csaviz@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Scott Merry

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

smerry@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Luke Lee

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

llee4@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Mr. Robbie Coomes, P.E.

Graduate Student Mentor Email

Robert.Coomes@ch2m.com

Graduate Student Mentor Department

CH2M

Additional Mentors

Mr. J.P. Loomis, EIT

JP.Loomis@ch2m.com

CH2M

Abstract/Artist Statement

The four million miles of roadway that span the U.S. make our lives easier in many ways, but not without consequences. By dividing the land into smaller, bounded sections, roads contribute to habitat loss and fragmentation. Roads are barriers to animal movement and, in extreme cases, can be the main cause of a species' population decline. When vehicles and animal populations are arranged in close proximity, interactions between the two become more frequent. The National Cooperative Highway Research Program estimates that 725,000 to 1.5 million wildlife-vehicle collisions occur in the U.S. every year. Such collisions can be fatal to wildlife and humans alike.

To prevent and counteract these detriments, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) offers a hierarchy of solutions when planning transportation projects: avoid, mitigate, and compensate. New transportation projects should avoid critical wildlife habitat. Mitigation aims to reduce the impact the road makes on vehicle safety and wildlife populations, and can be accomplished by constructing wildlife crossings. If mitigation is not an option, FHWA directs to compensate for the ecological effect in some way. Wildlife crossings mitigate the adverse effects of pre-existing roadways.

Avengineers has proposed a wildlife overpass along Interstate 5 in Sacramento County near the Cosumnes River Preserve, home to a variety of wildlife from river otters to mule deer. Animals will be directed to the bridge by fencing along the side of the road. Structural bridge components include concrete bridge deck and median wall. A mechanically stabilized earth retaining wall was designed to support the concrete bridge deck and soil approaches. Soil will also be placed on top of the concrete deck along with native vegetation. Storm water runoff was designed to percolate through the top soil, but ultimately drain off the bridge deck and into retaining ponds for groundwater recharge.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

6-5-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

6-5-2017 4:00 PM

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May 6th, 2:30 PM May 6th, 4:00 PM

Wildlife Crossing Overpass Project

School of Engineering & Computer Science

The four million miles of roadway that span the U.S. make our lives easier in many ways, but not without consequences. By dividing the land into smaller, bounded sections, roads contribute to habitat loss and fragmentation. Roads are barriers to animal movement and, in extreme cases, can be the main cause of a species' population decline. When vehicles and animal populations are arranged in close proximity, interactions between the two become more frequent. The National Cooperative Highway Research Program estimates that 725,000 to 1.5 million wildlife-vehicle collisions occur in the U.S. every year. Such collisions can be fatal to wildlife and humans alike.

To prevent and counteract these detriments, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) offers a hierarchy of solutions when planning transportation projects: avoid, mitigate, and compensate. New transportation projects should avoid critical wildlife habitat. Mitigation aims to reduce the impact the road makes on vehicle safety and wildlife populations, and can be accomplished by constructing wildlife crossings. If mitigation is not an option, FHWA directs to compensate for the ecological effect in some way. Wildlife crossings mitigate the adverse effects of pre-existing roadways.

Avengineers has proposed a wildlife overpass along Interstate 5 in Sacramento County near the Cosumnes River Preserve, home to a variety of wildlife from river otters to mule deer. Animals will be directed to the bridge by fencing along the side of the road. Structural bridge components include concrete bridge deck and median wall. A mechanically stabilized earth retaining wall was designed to support the concrete bridge deck and soil approaches. Soil will also be placed on top of the concrete deck along with native vegetation. Storm water runoff was designed to percolate through the top soil, but ultimately drain off the bridge deck and into retaining ponds for groundwater recharge.