Title

Prosthetic Dog Leg

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Kyle Watson

Faculty Mentor Email

kwatson@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

The purpose of this project is to design and fabricate a prosthetic leg that does not require amputation to fit a group member’s dog. The dog, Pogo, was born with a deformed front leg, caused by leg development against the side of the womb. The importance of this project is driven by a desire to improve Pogo’s quality of life. Over time, Pogo’s deformity will lead to joint damage and strained muscles without the aid of a prosthetic limb. To fit a traditional prosthetic, partial amputation would be required. By amputating the limb, a better base of attachment is created. However, the costs of amputation may not be economical for every family. Amputation costs range from $2-3000, and a traditional prosthetic ranges from $600-1500. Pogo’s prosthetic limb is designed to meet a set of objectives, including: safe and secure attachment, daily use not requiring major adjustment, comfort and support for running, jumping, walking, and laying down, and costing less than a traditional prosthetic requiring amputation. To meet the objectives, a prosthetic limb was created using 3D printing and incorporating a spring/damper system to provide force damping and comfort. The successful completion of the stated objectives depends on Pogo’s adaptation and comfort in using the prosthetic and whether the prosthetic met strength and cost requirements. To date, Pogo has made progress walking and running using the full assembly. Pogo does not bite or attempt to remove the leg attachment component, indicating comfort. However, full rehabilitation of leg strength and ability to wear the prosthetic for extended use remains to be seen as Pogo’s leg continues to build strength. The prosthetic costs less than $100 to produce and meets all durability requirements.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

6-5-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

6-5-2017 4:00 PM

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May 6th, 2:30 PM May 6th, 4:00 PM

Prosthetic Dog Leg

School of Engineering & Computer Science

The purpose of this project is to design and fabricate a prosthetic leg that does not require amputation to fit a group member’s dog. The dog, Pogo, was born with a deformed front leg, caused by leg development against the side of the womb. The importance of this project is driven by a desire to improve Pogo’s quality of life. Over time, Pogo’s deformity will lead to joint damage and strained muscles without the aid of a prosthetic limb. To fit a traditional prosthetic, partial amputation would be required. By amputating the limb, a better base of attachment is created. However, the costs of amputation may not be economical for every family. Amputation costs range from $2-3000, and a traditional prosthetic ranges from $600-1500. Pogo’s prosthetic limb is designed to meet a set of objectives, including: safe and secure attachment, daily use not requiring major adjustment, comfort and support for running, jumping, walking, and laying down, and costing less than a traditional prosthetic requiring amputation. To meet the objectives, a prosthetic limb was created using 3D printing and incorporating a spring/damper system to provide force damping and comfort. The successful completion of the stated objectives depends on Pogo’s adaptation and comfort in using the prosthetic and whether the prosthetic met strength and cost requirements. To date, Pogo has made progress walking and running using the full assembly. Pogo does not bite or attempt to remove the leg attachment component, indicating comfort. However, full rehabilitation of leg strength and ability to wear the prosthetic for extended use remains to be seen as Pogo’s leg continues to build strength. The prosthetic costs less than $100 to produce and meets all durability requirements.