Title

Auditory morphology of the túngara frog

Poster Number

07C

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Professor

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Frogs communicate using sound either in air or under water. Species which communicate under water (pipids) have an expanded, disc-shaped extrastapes as opposed to a thin cartilage behind the eardrum. Preliminary dissections indicate that the túngara frog may exhibit a similar disc of cartilage. This disc as well as female responses to the male in water indicates that túngara frogs may have auditory specializations to hear under water. In order to assess the 3D structure of the expanded extrastapes, we embedded ears of the túngara frog in resin and produced histological sections. We tried various decalcification times and microwave treatments to identify a suitable protocol for túngara frog ears. Preliminary sections confirm that the extrastapes has a broad attachment to the eardrum in the shape of a cartilaginous disc. This structure shares its main features with those of underwater specialists strengthening the evidence for underwater communication in túngara frogs. The study of their auditory morphology, hearing sensitivity and biomechanics will shed novel light into the evolution of communication systems when animals cross the boundaries between media.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Auditory morphology of the túngara frog

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Frogs communicate using sound either in air or under water. Species which communicate under water (pipids) have an expanded, disc-shaped extrastapes as opposed to a thin cartilage behind the eardrum. Preliminary dissections indicate that the túngara frog may exhibit a similar disc of cartilage. This disc as well as female responses to the male in water indicates that túngara frogs may have auditory specializations to hear under water. In order to assess the 3D structure of the expanded extrastapes, we embedded ears of the túngara frog in resin and produced histological sections. We tried various decalcification times and microwave treatments to identify a suitable protocol for túngara frog ears. Preliminary sections confirm that the extrastapes has a broad attachment to the eardrum in the shape of a cartilaginous disc. This structure shares its main features with those of underwater specialists strengthening the evidence for underwater communication in túngara frogs. The study of their auditory morphology, hearing sensitivity and biomechanics will shed novel light into the evolution of communication systems when animals cross the boundaries between media.