Title

Airplane Flaps Demonstration

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Kyle Watson

Faculty Mentor Email

kwatson@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Airplane Flaps Demonstration project consists of two parts: an adjustable airfoil with a movable flap and instrumentation to measure the lift acting on the airfoil. The purpose of the design is to provide visual demonstration of the forces that produce lift on an airplane wing. The angle of attack and flap angle can be changed with a controller to demonstrate how different angles affect the forces on the airfoil. The instrumentation to measure the lift was created because the existing equipment in the university’s wind tunnel could only measure drag and the instrumentation that can measure both lift and drag is currently not operating and costly to replace. The new lift instrumentation needed to be small enough so the airfoil can fit in the viewing area of the wind tunnel, be stable at significant wind speeds, and have a minimal blockage ratio when combined with the airfoil. Initial testing has shown that the wind speed must be kept around 4.5 m/s so the servo can function correctly. Initial testing also shows that, as predicted, changes in the angle of attack and/or flap angle correspond to respective changes in lift and drag.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

6-5-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

6-5-2017 4:00 PM

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May 6th, 2:30 PM May 6th, 4:00 PM

Airplane Flaps Demonstration

School of Engineering & Computer Science

The Airplane Flaps Demonstration project consists of two parts: an adjustable airfoil with a movable flap and instrumentation to measure the lift acting on the airfoil. The purpose of the design is to provide visual demonstration of the forces that produce lift on an airplane wing. The angle of attack and flap angle can be changed with a controller to demonstrate how different angles affect the forces on the airfoil. The instrumentation to measure the lift was created because the existing equipment in the university’s wind tunnel could only measure drag and the instrumentation that can measure both lift and drag is currently not operating and costly to replace. The new lift instrumentation needed to be small enough so the airfoil can fit in the viewing area of the wind tunnel, be stable at significant wind speeds, and have a minimal blockage ratio when combined with the airfoil. Initial testing has shown that the wind speed must be kept around 4.5 m/s so the servo can function correctly. Initial testing also shows that, as predicted, changes in the angle of attack and/or flap angle correspond to respective changes in lift and drag.