Title

Automated ACL Integrity Test

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Huihui Xu

Faculty Mentor Email

hxu@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Currently, the Lachman test is a test used by athletic trainers to determine if athletes have injured their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The test is performed by first stabilizing the distal femur and grabbing the proximal tibia, and then pulling anteriorly on the proximal tibia. The test is positive if there is excessive anterior translation of the knee. The test, done by hand, is subjective and susceptible to human error. The objective of this study is to create a method that automates existing testing procedures in detection of an ACL tear in adults. A mechanical support system holds the patient’s leg at the ideal angles with the femur and tibia strapped down. Using an Arduino microcontroller and linear actuator, the system is fully automated to perform the Lachman test and then display the tibia displacement metric on an LCD screen. This metric is then compared to the metric of the other knee to determine if the ACL is intact. The experiment was proof of concept, as model knees were created to imitate the response of an intact, torn, and partially torn ACL.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

6-5-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

6-5-2017 4:00 PM

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May 6th, 2:30 PM May 6th, 4:00 PM

Automated ACL Integrity Test

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Currently, the Lachman test is a test used by athletic trainers to determine if athletes have injured their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The test is performed by first stabilizing the distal femur and grabbing the proximal tibia, and then pulling anteriorly on the proximal tibia. The test is positive if there is excessive anterior translation of the knee. The test, done by hand, is subjective and susceptible to human error. The objective of this study is to create a method that automates existing testing procedures in detection of an ACL tear in adults. A mechanical support system holds the patient’s leg at the ideal angles with the femur and tibia strapped down. Using an Arduino microcontroller and linear actuator, the system is fully automated to perform the Lachman test and then display the tibia displacement metric on an LCD screen. This metric is then compared to the metric of the other knee to determine if the ACL is intact. The experiment was proof of concept, as model knees were created to imitate the response of an intact, torn, and partially torn ACL.