Title

Audiometer Machine Designed for Developing Countries

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Additional Authors

Note: We are all first authors to this report.

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Huihui Xu

Faculty Mentor Email

hxu@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Abstract/Artist Statement

Team Flying Papaya has developed a portable, inexpensive device that measures hearing impairment of individuals in developing countries who may not have a noise-controlled setting. An audiometer machine is the all-encompassing name for our device, which includes a control box, a patient response system and sound-proof headphones. An Arduino Uno controls the components and is housed as the brain of the control box. The circuits for stimulating audio and controlling volume are also in the control box. The layout of the control box is easy to use for the untrained operator and does not require a large amount of power as opposed to market audiometer competitors. The patient response system is our method of informing the operator that the patient has or has not heard the audio. The system involves a left and right button for the patient that when pressed will light a green LED of the same name, and should no button be pressed a red LED will light indicating an error, requiring operator response. It is a more efficient method of communicating patient responses with any untrained operator by removing discrepancies from patient position and operator judgment. The design of our sound-proof headphones is a double cup system utilizing earmuffs and headphones. These sound-proof headphones prevent outside sound interference and transmits audio. Headphones used with audiometers require a quiet testing environment, whereas these sound-proof headphones are suitable with natural ambient noise. This solution acknowledges the constraints by pursuing a low-cost and easy to use system. We utilized cheap prototyping methods with breadboards and 3D-printers.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

6-5-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

6-5-2017 4:00 PM

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May 6th, 2:30 PM May 6th, 4:00 PM

Audiometer Machine Designed for Developing Countries

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Team Flying Papaya has developed a portable, inexpensive device that measures hearing impairment of individuals in developing countries who may not have a noise-controlled setting. An audiometer machine is the all-encompassing name for our device, which includes a control box, a patient response system and sound-proof headphones. An Arduino Uno controls the components and is housed as the brain of the control box. The circuits for stimulating audio and controlling volume are also in the control box. The layout of the control box is easy to use for the untrained operator and does not require a large amount of power as opposed to market audiometer competitors. The patient response system is our method of informing the operator that the patient has or has not heard the audio. The system involves a left and right button for the patient that when pressed will light a green LED of the same name, and should no button be pressed a red LED will light indicating an error, requiring operator response. It is a more efficient method of communicating patient responses with any untrained operator by removing discrepancies from patient position and operator judgment. The design of our sound-proof headphones is a double cup system utilizing earmuffs and headphones. These sound-proof headphones prevent outside sound interference and transmits audio. Headphones used with audiometers require a quiet testing environment, whereas these sound-proof headphones are suitable with natural ambient noise. This solution acknowledges the constraints by pursuing a low-cost and easy to use system. We utilized cheap prototyping methods with breadboards and 3D-printers.