Title

The Evolution and Function of the CPI-17 Family of Phosphatase Inhibitors in Zebrafish

Poster Number

06C

Lead Author Major

Biology

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Douglas Weiser

Faculty Mentor Email

dweiser@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major cellular phosphatase that regulates countless cellular processes, including cellular metabolism, actomyosin contraction, cell division. PP1 is regulated primarily through protein-protein interaction with regulatory and inhibitory subunits. One group of PP1 inhibitory subunits is the CPI-17 family of proteins. In humans, the CPI-17 family is comprised of Cpi-17, Phi-1, Kepi and GBP1. Misregulation of the CPI-17 family has been linked to cancer progression, learning and memory and cardiovascular disease. Despite the link between the CPI-17 family and human health, these proteins have been relatively poorly studied. To better understand the function of the CPI-17 we characterized the gene family in the genetic model organism, zebrafish. Using RT-PCR we characterized the gene expression pattern and found that Kepi and GBP1 were not expressed during early embryonic expression. Interestingly, not only were CPI-17 and Phi-1 expressed during early development, but we discovered that there are actually two genes for CPI-17 and an addition two genes for Phi-1. We hypothesized that these duplicated genes resulted from a whole genome duplication early in the evolution of bony fish. Gene duplication is a common mechanism in evolution, but the fate of the duplicated genes can differ. Most commonly one of the genes losses function. In some cases, both genes are conserved and act in redundant manner. In other cases, the genes diverge by changing expression patterns or mechanism. We found no evidence that the biochemical functions of the paired genes has diverged. However, we found that the genes have diverged in localization, with one gene localized primarily in the nervous system and the other expressed primarily in the muscle. Finally, we have undertaken a bioinformatic analysis to examine the genetic relationship between the duplicated CPI-17 and Phi-1 genes in multiple fish species to better understand the evolutionary history of this gene family. Taken together these results will lead to a better understanding of the evolution, function and mechanism of the CPI-17 family of phosphatase inhibitors.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

The Evolution and Function of the CPI-17 Family of Phosphatase Inhibitors in Zebrafish

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major cellular phosphatase that regulates countless cellular processes, including cellular metabolism, actomyosin contraction, cell division. PP1 is regulated primarily through protein-protein interaction with regulatory and inhibitory subunits. One group of PP1 inhibitory subunits is the CPI-17 family of proteins. In humans, the CPI-17 family is comprised of Cpi-17, Phi-1, Kepi and GBP1. Misregulation of the CPI-17 family has been linked to cancer progression, learning and memory and cardiovascular disease. Despite the link between the CPI-17 family and human health, these proteins have been relatively poorly studied. To better understand the function of the CPI-17 we characterized the gene family in the genetic model organism, zebrafish. Using RT-PCR we characterized the gene expression pattern and found that Kepi and GBP1 were not expressed during early embryonic expression. Interestingly, not only were CPI-17 and Phi-1 expressed during early development, but we discovered that there are actually two genes for CPI-17 and an addition two genes for Phi-1. We hypothesized that these duplicated genes resulted from a whole genome duplication early in the evolution of bony fish. Gene duplication is a common mechanism in evolution, but the fate of the duplicated genes can differ. Most commonly one of the genes losses function. In some cases, both genes are conserved and act in redundant manner. In other cases, the genes diverge by changing expression patterns or mechanism. We found no evidence that the biochemical functions of the paired genes has diverged. However, we found that the genes have diverged in localization, with one gene localized primarily in the nervous system and the other expressed primarily in the muscle. Finally, we have undertaken a bioinformatic analysis to examine the genetic relationship between the duplicated CPI-17 and Phi-1 genes in multiple fish species to better understand the evolutionary history of this gene family. Taken together these results will lead to a better understanding of the evolution, function and mechanism of the CPI-17 family of phosphatase inhibitors.