Title

Presence of Hidden Threats in Beeswax: Pesticides and Chemicals

Poster Number

21B

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Third Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Third Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Mark Brunell

Faculty Mentor Email

mbrunell@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

As honey bee populations continue to decline, a large role to ensure the pollination of our essential crops is lost. Without bee pollination, we risk the loss of greater genetic diversity and the production of stronger and healthier plants. It has been speculated that the decline in bee populations has been due to the use of chemical pesticides in commercial crops today, but in order to confirm the presence of these deadly chemicals, mass spectrometry was used in order to identify specific pesticides in beeswax.

By modifying given procedures, we were better able to understand how to test beeswax and analyze the data that resulted from these tests. In the future, knowing the specific pesticides present in hives that have diminishing populations will bring us a step closer to preventing this decline. Overall, it is important to understand the role honey bees in our agriculture and to seek out methods to examine how the pesticides are affecting bee populations.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

Presence of Hidden Threats in Beeswax: Pesticides and Chemicals

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

As honey bee populations continue to decline, a large role to ensure the pollination of our essential crops is lost. Without bee pollination, we risk the loss of greater genetic diversity and the production of stronger and healthier plants. It has been speculated that the decline in bee populations has been due to the use of chemical pesticides in commercial crops today, but in order to confirm the presence of these deadly chemicals, mass spectrometry was used in order to identify specific pesticides in beeswax.

By modifying given procedures, we were better able to understand how to test beeswax and analyze the data that resulted from these tests. In the future, knowing the specific pesticides present in hives that have diminishing populations will bring us a step closer to preventing this decline. Overall, it is important to understand the role honey bees in our agriculture and to seek out methods to examine how the pesticides are affecting bee populations.