Title

How does stress influence performance anxiety in field crickets?

Poster Number

14

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Zachary Stahlschmidt

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Mating behavior is of critical importance to animals. Yet, stressors (e.g., limited resources for food, shelter, or water) may inhibit animals from engaging in reproductive behaviors to ensure survival (e.g., foregoing mating to reduce the risk of predation). Due to the stress of being exposed and without shelter, field crickets alter decisions related to mate choice and egglaying— yet, the effect of such a stressor on mating activity is unknown. In the short-winged sand field cricket (Gryllus firmus) individuals were isolated for the first 4 or 8 days of adulthood. During isolation, half of the crickets had shelter (egg crate) while the remaining crickets were exposed to their individual containers. At the end of isolation, male-female pairs were established to solicit overnight mating. We predict that crickets exposed (nonsheltered) during isolation will exhibit reduced mating frequency given the stress of exposure before and during mating opportunities. We also predict that older crickets (i.e., those isolated for 8 days) will exhibit increased mating frequency given their reduced number of lifetime mating opportunities. Our results will provide new insight into the interactive effects of two widespread factors (age and stress) on mating success.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:30 AM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

How does stress influence performance anxiety in field crickets?

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Mating behavior is of critical importance to animals. Yet, stressors (e.g., limited resources for food, shelter, or water) may inhibit animals from engaging in reproductive behaviors to ensure survival (e.g., foregoing mating to reduce the risk of predation). Due to the stress of being exposed and without shelter, field crickets alter decisions related to mate choice and egglaying— yet, the effect of such a stressor on mating activity is unknown. In the short-winged sand field cricket (Gryllus firmus) individuals were isolated for the first 4 or 8 days of adulthood. During isolation, half of the crickets had shelter (egg crate) while the remaining crickets were exposed to their individual containers. At the end of isolation, male-female pairs were established to solicit overnight mating. We predict that crickets exposed (nonsheltered) during isolation will exhibit reduced mating frequency given the stress of exposure before and during mating opportunities. We also predict that older crickets (i.e., those isolated for 8 days) will exhibit increased mating frequency given their reduced number of lifetime mating opportunities. Our results will provide new insight into the interactive effects of two widespread factors (age and stress) on mating success.