Title

Coupled Jet Engine Proof of Concept

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Kyle Watson

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

This project demonstrates the possibility of a new type of internal combustion engine, using jet engine technology to create shaft-work. This configuration could be adapted to run on any number of fuels and produce enough power to be used instead of the traditional four-stroke engine. This design offers fewer moving parts, size, and eliminates the rotary action of a piston and cylinder. To prove the possibility of this design, four configurations are modeled in 3D CAD and tested through CFD simulations. Each configuration is simplified, omitting components that would be similar to a traditional jet engine. For simulations, the compression and combustion phases are included through input boundary conditions. Of the four configurations, the most successful was constructed out of plastic. The demonstration model is powered by compressed air and includes instrumentation to relate actual performance to CFD results. All results suggest that a functional Coupled Jet Engine could be built.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

7-5-2020 2:30 PM

End Date

7-5-2020 4:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 7th, 2:30 PM May 7th, 4:00 PM

Coupled Jet Engine Proof of Concept

School of Engineering & Computer Science

This project demonstrates the possibility of a new type of internal combustion engine, using jet engine technology to create shaft-work. This configuration could be adapted to run on any number of fuels and produce enough power to be used instead of the traditional four-stroke engine. This design offers fewer moving parts, size, and eliminates the rotary action of a piston and cylinder. To prove the possibility of this design, four configurations are modeled in 3D CAD and tested through CFD simulations. Each configuration is simplified, omitting components that would be similar to a traditional jet engine. For simulations, the compression and combustion phases are included through input boundary conditions. Of the four configurations, the most successful was constructed out of plastic. The demonstration model is powered by compressed air and includes instrumentation to relate actual performance to CFD results. All results suggest that a functional Coupled Jet Engine could be built.