Title

Wearable American Sign Language Translation Device

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Huihui Xu

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

There are up to 2 million American Sign Language (ASL) speakers in the United States alone, and ASL is the primary sign language of deaf communities in these regions. However, unless an individual is part of this community, they typically do not know ASL therefore limiting communication between ASL and non ASL speakers. We are attempting to create a wearable glove that will translate the sign language of the word pacific into English. In order to do this, five 3” flex sensors, each for the five fingers, will be attached to the outside of a glove. The sensors will then be connected using a voltage divider in order to measure the change in voltage across each sensor. An Arduino Uno Rev3 microcontroller will be used to assign alphabetical letters of the word pacific to the changes in voltage. We will take 20 random trials of the device in order to test the accuracy of the device. Our goal is to translate the ASL equivalent of the word pacific into English with at least 75% accuracy.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

7-5-2020 2:30 PM

End Date

7-5-2020 4:00 PM

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May 7th, 2:30 PM May 7th, 4:00 PM

Wearable American Sign Language Translation Device

School of Engineering & Computer Science

There are up to 2 million American Sign Language (ASL) speakers in the United States alone, and ASL is the primary sign language of deaf communities in these regions. However, unless an individual is part of this community, they typically do not know ASL therefore limiting communication between ASL and non ASL speakers. We are attempting to create a wearable glove that will translate the sign language of the word pacific into English. In order to do this, five 3” flex sensors, each for the five fingers, will be attached to the outside of a glove. The sensors will then be connected using a voltage divider in order to measure the change in voltage across each sensor. An Arduino Uno Rev3 microcontroller will be used to assign alphabetical letters of the word pacific to the changes in voltage. We will take 20 random trials of the device in order to test the accuracy of the device. Our goal is to translate the ASL equivalent of the word pacific into English with at least 75% accuracy.