Title

Comparing the immature stage morphology of Speyeria callippe subspecies to assess convergence in adult phenotypes

Poster Number

26

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences and Geological & Environmental Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ryan Hill

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Speyeria butterflies are polytypic species with many subspecies varying extensively in color pattern. In California, Speyeria callippe alone has 13 subspecies, and ranges widely from southern California up the coast range and across the mountains of the Sierra Nevada and Cascades. The polytypic nature of Speyeria is exhibited in California S. callippe by the patchwork geographic distribution seen in subspecies with similar adult phenotypes, S. callippe adiasteoides is similar to S. c. juba and S. c. macaria/laurina; whereas S. c. liliana is similar to S. c. elaine. This could be explained by these taxa being relatively closely related compared to their neighboring populations. However, focusing on adult phenotypes to understand relationships may be misleading because of selection for crypsis or mimicry. Thus, this study focused on comparing the immature larval stages (caterpillars) of these S. callippe taxa to test whether they are close relatives or not. Previous studies in our lab showed differences in larval morphology between the Coast Ranges, Siskiyous/Cascades and Sierra Nevada but this was based on samples from few populations and data were not available for S. c. liliana. Here we examine additional populations, including sampling S. c. liliana, to test whether larvae from the same geographic region are similar. If S. c. adiasteoides, S. c. juba and S. c. macaria/laurina are more closely related, and if S. c. liliana and S. c. elaine are more closely related, they should have similar larval stage patterns as well as adult phenotypes. However, if the larvae are similar in geographically adjacent regions, we would conclude that the adult phenotypes are convergent.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:30 AM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

Comparing the immature stage morphology of Speyeria callippe subspecies to assess convergence in adult phenotypes

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Speyeria butterflies are polytypic species with many subspecies varying extensively in color pattern. In California, Speyeria callippe alone has 13 subspecies, and ranges widely from southern California up the coast range and across the mountains of the Sierra Nevada and Cascades. The polytypic nature of Speyeria is exhibited in California S. callippe by the patchwork geographic distribution seen in subspecies with similar adult phenotypes, S. callippe adiasteoides is similar to S. c. juba and S. c. macaria/laurina; whereas S. c. liliana is similar to S. c. elaine. This could be explained by these taxa being relatively closely related compared to their neighboring populations. However, focusing on adult phenotypes to understand relationships may be misleading because of selection for crypsis or mimicry. Thus, this study focused on comparing the immature larval stages (caterpillars) of these S. callippe taxa to test whether they are close relatives or not. Previous studies in our lab showed differences in larval morphology between the Coast Ranges, Siskiyous/Cascades and Sierra Nevada but this was based on samples from few populations and data were not available for S. c. liliana. Here we examine additional populations, including sampling S. c. liliana, to test whether larvae from the same geographic region are similar. If S. c. adiasteoides, S. c. juba and S. c. macaria/laurina are more closely related, and if S. c. liliana and S. c. elaine are more closely related, they should have similar larval stage patterns as well as adult phenotypes. However, if the larvae are similar in geographically adjacent regions, we would conclude that the adult phenotypes are convergent.