Title

Variation in the calls of crickets and frogs

Poster Number

19

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Sexual selection drives males of numerous species to develop conspicuous and costly ornaments or advertisement signals to attract mates. In nocturnal animals, males commonly strive to optimize the use of their limited energy budget to attract mates through advertisement callings. We monitored the calling of individual male crickets (Acheta domesticus) and tungara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus) 24 hours a day for at least one week in almost identical acoustic environments to identify common patterns in their calling strategies. For each individual, we analyzed 10 minutes of the greatest activity and measured frequency, duration, amplitude, and period for each pulse and call. The frog's calling activity was more concentrated in time, and the peak activity occurred earlier in the night than in crickets. Frogs produced approximately a third of the total amount of calls the crickets produced. Both frogs and crickets exhibited larger coefficients of variation (CV) among individuals than within individuals for all call variables. Both CVs were highly similar for call frequency and duration, but the cricket calls were 50% more variable in amplitude than the frog calls. This initial analysis indicated that given a same environmental setting, crickets and frogs differ in time allocation of their signaling efforts, but have similar variability in their signals. Future work should examine effort allocation and variability at finer time scales and explore the adjustments produced by each organism in response to environmental change.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

26-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 2:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:00 PM

Variation in the calls of crickets and frogs

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Sexual selection drives males of numerous species to develop conspicuous and costly ornaments or advertisement signals to attract mates. In nocturnal animals, males commonly strive to optimize the use of their limited energy budget to attract mates through advertisement callings. We monitored the calling of individual male crickets (Acheta domesticus) and tungara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus) 24 hours a day for at least one week in almost identical acoustic environments to identify common patterns in their calling strategies. For each individual, we analyzed 10 minutes of the greatest activity and measured frequency, duration, amplitude, and period for each pulse and call. The frog's calling activity was more concentrated in time, and the peak activity occurred earlier in the night than in crickets. Frogs produced approximately a third of the total amount of calls the crickets produced. Both frogs and crickets exhibited larger coefficients of variation (CV) among individuals than within individuals for all call variables. Both CVs were highly similar for call frequency and duration, but the cricket calls were 50% more variable in amplitude than the frog calls. This initial analysis indicated that given a same environmental setting, crickets and frogs differ in time allocation of their signaling efforts, but have similar variability in their signals. Future work should examine effort allocation and variability at finer time scales and explore the adjustments produced by each organism in response to environmental change.