Title

Redox conditions mobilizing metals within an urban stream

Poster Number

15

Lead Author Major

Environmental Science

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Laura Rademacher

Faculty Mentor Department

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Acid mine drainage from an abandoned Sulfur mine in Oakland, California greatly effects the Lion Creek Watershed by contributing trace metals and influencing the physicochemical properties within the watershed. The goal of this research is to understand existing relationships between spatial and temporal fluctuations in physiochemical conditions that exist at the reservoir which will enable a better understanding on the efficiency for the reservoir to act as a sink for pollutants. Water samples were collected beginning in July 2009 from Lion Creek and its two tributaries as well as the inlet and outlet of Lake Aliso. Depth profiles analyzing dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature variability indicate stratification of the water column existing relative to changes in climate. Iron concentrations fluctuating cyclically on an annual basis suggest oxidizing conditions are present within the watershed. Ultimately, these redox conditions that exist enable mobility of metals and contribute to the overlying pollution of the streams. It is important to understand these changes within the lake and watershed due to Lion Creek ultimately discharging into the San Francisco Bay hampering water quality conditions.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

26-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 2:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:00 PM

Redox conditions mobilizing metals within an urban stream

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Acid mine drainage from an abandoned Sulfur mine in Oakland, California greatly effects the Lion Creek Watershed by contributing trace metals and influencing the physicochemical properties within the watershed. The goal of this research is to understand existing relationships between spatial and temporal fluctuations in physiochemical conditions that exist at the reservoir which will enable a better understanding on the efficiency for the reservoir to act as a sink for pollutants. Water samples were collected beginning in July 2009 from Lion Creek and its two tributaries as well as the inlet and outlet of Lake Aliso. Depth profiles analyzing dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature variability indicate stratification of the water column existing relative to changes in climate. Iron concentrations fluctuating cyclically on an annual basis suggest oxidizing conditions are present within the watershed. Ultimately, these redox conditions that exist enable mobility of metals and contribute to the overlying pollution of the streams. It is important to understand these changes within the lake and watershed due to Lion Creek ultimately discharging into the San Francisco Bay hampering water quality conditions.