Title

Calcium-related proteins in Pichia pastoris

Poster Number

46

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Der Thor

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

The study of homology between different species is a common practice performed to learn more about the relationship between related species. Homology can be studied by looking for homologous genes or homologous proteins between organisms. The purpose of this study is to identify possible calcium-related genes and proteins present in Pichia pastoris. To conduct this study, known calcium-related genes in Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared to the Pichia pastoris genome. This was done using the National Center for Biotechnology Information BLAST engine to compare nucleotide and amino acid sequences between the aforementioned species. Various data given by the computer program allowed us to confidently determine homology between human and S. cerevisiae genes and proteins with that of P. pastoris. We only found a few calcium-related genes in S. cerevisiae that were likely homologous to known genes of P. pastoris and no homologous human genes. However, protein analysis showed more homology using this method. Our results indicate that the calcium signaling mechanism is partially conserved between these two species of yeast but not between yeast and humans.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 3:00 PM

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Calcium-related proteins in Pichia pastoris

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The study of homology between different species is a common practice performed to learn more about the relationship between related species. Homology can be studied by looking for homologous genes or homologous proteins between organisms. The purpose of this study is to identify possible calcium-related genes and proteins present in Pichia pastoris. To conduct this study, known calcium-related genes in Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared to the Pichia pastoris genome. This was done using the National Center for Biotechnology Information BLAST engine to compare nucleotide and amino acid sequences between the aforementioned species. Various data given by the computer program allowed us to confidently determine homology between human and S. cerevisiae genes and proteins with that of P. pastoris. We only found a few calcium-related genes in S. cerevisiae that were likely homologous to known genes of P. pastoris and no homologous human genes. However, protein analysis showed more homology using this method. Our results indicate that the calcium signaling mechanism is partially conserved between these two species of yeast but not between yeast and humans.