Title

A study of larval stages in subspecies of Speyeria callippe and their morphological concordance with adult wing patterns

Poster Number

37

Lead Author Major

Pre-Pharmacy and Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ryan Hill

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Morphological studies of adult Speyeria callippe reveal striking wing pattern variation in California with 13 described subspecies. Although S. callippe color pattern differs across the state, in many localities multiple Speyeria species exist that resemble one another, and this may be attributed to crypsis or interspecific mimicry. The patchwork of adult color patterns of S. callippe in California has been interpreted as evidence of multiple waves of colonization from Oregon. However, this hypothesis has not been tested with a phylogenetic analysis, and similarity of adult color pattern may be due to crypsis/mimicry rather than common descent. Therefore other datasets may help resolve patterns of diversity in this species. This project explores caterpillar morphology in S. callippe to: 1) examine the correlation with existing subspecies taxonomy, 2) test whether larval characters provide information for elucidating subspecies relationships, 3) search for strong morphological differences that could suggest species rather than subspecies relationships. This study is motivated by the fact that larval morphology has been neglected in description of subspecies. In addition, larvae are subject to different selective pressures than adults. Therefore, the larval stages represent an independent dataset for studying relationships among taxa. Furthermore, no studies have systematically examined morphological variation in the immature stages of this species. Given the large number of subspecies in California, it remains possible that larval morphology can rewrite our understanding of this species. For example, if sufficient morphological differences exist, this may be more consistent with the presence of multiple cryptic species rather than one.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 3:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

A study of larval stages in subspecies of Speyeria callippe and their morphological concordance with adult wing patterns

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Morphological studies of adult Speyeria callippe reveal striking wing pattern variation in California with 13 described subspecies. Although S. callippe color pattern differs across the state, in many localities multiple Speyeria species exist that resemble one another, and this may be attributed to crypsis or interspecific mimicry. The patchwork of adult color patterns of S. callippe in California has been interpreted as evidence of multiple waves of colonization from Oregon. However, this hypothesis has not been tested with a phylogenetic analysis, and similarity of adult color pattern may be due to crypsis/mimicry rather than common descent. Therefore other datasets may help resolve patterns of diversity in this species. This project explores caterpillar morphology in S. callippe to: 1) examine the correlation with existing subspecies taxonomy, 2) test whether larval characters provide information for elucidating subspecies relationships, 3) search for strong morphological differences that could suggest species rather than subspecies relationships. This study is motivated by the fact that larval morphology has been neglected in description of subspecies. In addition, larvae are subject to different selective pressures than adults. Therefore, the larval stages represent an independent dataset for studying relationships among taxa. Furthermore, no studies have systematically examined morphological variation in the immature stages of this species. Given the large number of subspecies in California, it remains possible that larval morphology can rewrite our understanding of this species. For example, if sufficient morphological differences exist, this may be more consistent with the presence of multiple cryptic species rather than one.