Title

Wireless Power Transfer

Poster Number

21

Lead Author Major

Electrical Engineering

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Elizabeth Basha

Faculty Mentor Department

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

The purpose of my research was to investigate the concepts of wireless power transfer via inductive coupling. The motivation for performing the research came from investigating a problem with current power transfer techniques. For example, if a sensor network is being used to obtain data from the San Francisco Bay Bridge, there needs to be some sort of way to provide power to these devices when the batteries die. A common technique for completing this task would be to use solar power to provide power; however, on a sensor network that could possibly be underneath the bridge or in an area that is not particularly sunny, this would pose a problem. This is where the unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) comes in. Brent Griffin designed this project as part of his thesis for University of Nebraska-Lincoln. There are a few components: the UAV(which has the power transmitter board) and the power receiver board. The UAV could thus fly over the receiver’s large coil, and transmit power using it’s equally large coil by the use of inductive coupling. My portion of this project was to design the receiver board. The board needed to take in the AC signal from the coil and rectify and regulate to voltages of 5V for a battery charger and 3.3V for logic levels of a microcontroller. I have designed and ordered all parts necessary and all that is left is to solder the components and test that my design behaves as expected.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 12:00 PM

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Wireless Power Transfer

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The purpose of my research was to investigate the concepts of wireless power transfer via inductive coupling. The motivation for performing the research came from investigating a problem with current power transfer techniques. For example, if a sensor network is being used to obtain data from the San Francisco Bay Bridge, there needs to be some sort of way to provide power to these devices when the batteries die. A common technique for completing this task would be to use solar power to provide power; however, on a sensor network that could possibly be underneath the bridge or in an area that is not particularly sunny, this would pose a problem. This is where the unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) comes in. Brent Griffin designed this project as part of his thesis for University of Nebraska-Lincoln. There are a few components: the UAV(which has the power transmitter board) and the power receiver board. The UAV could thus fly over the receiver’s large coil, and transmit power using it’s equally large coil by the use of inductive coupling. My portion of this project was to design the receiver board. The board needed to take in the AC signal from the coil and rectify and regulate to voltages of 5V for a battery charger and 3.3V for logic levels of a microcontroller. I have designed and ordered all parts necessary and all that is left is to solder the components and test that my design behaves as expected.