Title

Detection of Meteors by Radio Wave Reflection

Poster Number

20

Lead Author Major

Physics

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

James Hetrick

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Every day, tiny meteors strike the Earth and burn up in the atmosphere (~200 km). As this occurs, they ionize a very long (100+ km) thin line of air, which for a brief time acts as a conductor. Tuning a computer controlled radio to the frequency of a TV station broadcasting in San Jose, which cannot normally be received, short "reflection" signals can be detected when these radio waves reflect from the ionization trail of the meteor in our direction. These events can be measured and analyzed for occurrence.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 12:00 PM

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Detection of Meteors by Radio Wave Reflection

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Every day, tiny meteors strike the Earth and burn up in the atmosphere (~200 km). As this occurs, they ionize a very long (100+ km) thin line of air, which for a brief time acts as a conductor. Tuning a computer controlled radio to the frequency of a TV station broadcasting in San Jose, which cannot normally be received, short "reflection" signals can be detected when these radio waves reflect from the ionization trail of the meteor in our direction. These events can be measured and analyzed for occurrence.