Title

Perceived Desirability of Job Embeddedness Benefits: The Role of Gender

Lead Author Major

Business Administration

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Chris J. Sablynski

Faculty Mentor Department

Business

Abstract/Artist Statement

Voluntary employee turnover can cost organizations upwards of 30 percent of employee salary (Boushey & Glynn, 2012). Since job embeddedness was introduced into the employee turnover literature in 2001, it has been a powerful predictor of why people stay with their employers (Mitchell, Holtom, Lee, Sablynski, & Erez, 2001). In 2006, Holtom, Mitchell, and Lee published a list of 50 potential organizational benefits that may increase employee job embeddedness. However, to date, no empirical evidence exists regarding how attractive these benefits are to potential applicants, especially when gender is considered. Men and women often view workplace benefits differently, and these differences have yet to be explored in the context of job embeddedness. The purpose of this study was to examine the attractiveness of Holtom et al.’s (2006) list of benefits and compare responses by gender. An on-line survey of 184 currently employed adults (101 females, mean age = 30.38, SD = 13.26) was conducted. As hypothesized, results indicate a significant preference for on-site day care facilities by females (mean = 3.98, SD = 1.1) over males (mean = 3.68, SD = .99), t(182) = - 2.02, p = .045. In addition, as hypothesized, results indicate a significant preference for employer sponsored kid day camps by females (mean = 3.66, SD = .97) over males (mean = 3.31, SD = 1.07), t(182) = -2.32, p = .021. Finally, the hypothesized gender difference for flexible schedules preference was not supported. Future research on individual differences and desirability of workplace benefits is needed.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:10 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:25 AM

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Apr 20th, 10:10 AM Apr 20th, 10:25 AM

Perceived Desirability of Job Embeddedness Benefits: The Role of Gender

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Voluntary employee turnover can cost organizations upwards of 30 percent of employee salary (Boushey & Glynn, 2012). Since job embeddedness was introduced into the employee turnover literature in 2001, it has been a powerful predictor of why people stay with their employers (Mitchell, Holtom, Lee, Sablynski, & Erez, 2001). In 2006, Holtom, Mitchell, and Lee published a list of 50 potential organizational benefits that may increase employee job embeddedness. However, to date, no empirical evidence exists regarding how attractive these benefits are to potential applicants, especially when gender is considered. Men and women often view workplace benefits differently, and these differences have yet to be explored in the context of job embeddedness. The purpose of this study was to examine the attractiveness of Holtom et al.’s (2006) list of benefits and compare responses by gender. An on-line survey of 184 currently employed adults (101 females, mean age = 30.38, SD = 13.26) was conducted. As hypothesized, results indicate a significant preference for on-site day care facilities by females (mean = 3.98, SD = 1.1) over males (mean = 3.68, SD = .99), t(182) = - 2.02, p = .045. In addition, as hypothesized, results indicate a significant preference for employer sponsored kid day camps by females (mean = 3.66, SD = .97) over males (mean = 3.31, SD = 1.07), t(182) = -2.32, p = .021. Finally, the hypothesized gender difference for flexible schedules preference was not supported. Future research on individual differences and desirability of workplace benefits is needed.