Title

Considering the Intersection of Religion and Neurosurgical Practice

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Gary Howells

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

This study investigates how neurosurgeons’ religious commitments intersect with their clinical practice, and explores relationships between religiosity and clinical specialty. Previous research has focused on the desire of patients for spiritual support from clinicians, patient religiosity effecting health outcomes, and the ethical bounds of clinicians providing spiritual support. However, almost nothing is known about this phenomenon from the perspective of the physician. This inquiry takes the form of a qualitative study with significant data reported anonymously. Objectives include gathering data related to faith-based practices within the neurosurgical specialty, discovering how the physicians choose which spiritual practices to integrate, and learning about the process of implementing such practices and its impact on their patients. Previous findings support the use of spiritual values to support the patient, and empower the provider in addressing the well-being of the whole person. It is anticipated that this study will support those findings, and, perhaps most importantly, provide illumination and direction for future research. Potential applications include not only patient relevance, but also other less obvious areas, such as coping with burn out in the face of clinician shortage, and dealing with inappropriate professional conduct traditionally associated with high-pressure specialties.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:30 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 9:45 AM

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Apr 20th, 9:30 AM Apr 20th, 9:45 AM

Considering the Intersection of Religion and Neurosurgical Practice

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

This study investigates how neurosurgeons’ religious commitments intersect with their clinical practice, and explores relationships between religiosity and clinical specialty. Previous research has focused on the desire of patients for spiritual support from clinicians, patient religiosity effecting health outcomes, and the ethical bounds of clinicians providing spiritual support. However, almost nothing is known about this phenomenon from the perspective of the physician. This inquiry takes the form of a qualitative study with significant data reported anonymously. Objectives include gathering data related to faith-based practices within the neurosurgical specialty, discovering how the physicians choose which spiritual practices to integrate, and learning about the process of implementing such practices and its impact on their patients. Previous findings support the use of spiritual values to support the patient, and empower the provider in addressing the well-being of the whole person. It is anticipated that this study will support those findings, and, perhaps most importantly, provide illumination and direction for future research. Potential applications include not only patient relevance, but also other less obvious areas, such as coping with burn out in the face of clinician shortage, and dealing with inappropriate professional conduct traditionally associated with high-pressure specialties.