Title

The Myth of Black Solidarity and the Sexist Oppression of Black Women

Lead Author Major

English

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jeffrey Hole

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Abstract/Artist Statement

Black solidarity is an ambiguous concept that has been held to throughout the history of black people in America. Black solidarity is understood to be the way in which black people can actively and most effectively resist the duress white supremacy. However, I will argue that black solidarity is in fact a superimposition of institutional hierarchies within the black community. In that, the political and social needs of the least marginalized of black people: middle-class, heterosexual black men, are attended to, whereas, the needs of the poor, homosexual, and women are not. This creates a black community that mirrors oppressive white supremacist formation, steeped in sexism, classism, and heterosexism. I will specifically focus on the sexist oppression acted on black women and how this oppression is justified by black people who are invested in patriarchy but do this by arguing for the concept of black solidarity. But also, I will grapple with how the construction of the authentic black woman is entrapped in an acceptance of sexist norms and oppression. In this way, inauthentic black solidarity disempowers black women.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 215

Start Date

21-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2012 5:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 5:00 PM

The Myth of Black Solidarity and the Sexist Oppression of Black Women

DeRosa University Center, Room 215

Black solidarity is an ambiguous concept that has been held to throughout the history of black people in America. Black solidarity is understood to be the way in which black people can actively and most effectively resist the duress white supremacy. However, I will argue that black solidarity is in fact a superimposition of institutional hierarchies within the black community. In that, the political and social needs of the least marginalized of black people: middle-class, heterosexual black men, are attended to, whereas, the needs of the poor, homosexual, and women are not. This creates a black community that mirrors oppressive white supremacist formation, steeped in sexism, classism, and heterosexism. I will specifically focus on the sexist oppression acted on black women and how this oppression is justified by black people who are invested in patriarchy but do this by arguing for the concept of black solidarity. But also, I will grapple with how the construction of the authentic black woman is entrapped in an acceptance of sexist norms and oppression. In this way, inauthentic black solidarity disempowers black women.