Title

Solving the low dissolved oxygen problem by understanding the sources and fate of different nitrogen species entering in the San Joaquin River Estuary

Poster Number

21

Lead Author Major

Chemistry

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

William Stringfellow

Faculty Mentor Department

Environmental Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Stockton’s deepwater ship channel (DWSC) has been suffering from low dissolved oxygen for decades, especially in dry water years. The Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) has been the lead science agency on the Dissolved Oxygen (DO) Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) project since 2005. The purpose of this project is to collect and analyze data on the sources of nutrients, phytoplankton and oxygen-consuming materials in the San Joaquin River (SJR) estuary, the upstream SJR, and upstream tributaries to support the development of an estuary model. This model is needed by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) to provide modeling tools, scientific data and other information to support management actions that will be taken by the Regional Board and stakeholders to resolve the low DO problems in Stockton’s DWSC. For my part in this project, I have been responsible for measuring ammonia, nitrate, and total nitrogen in samples collected in 2011 as part of the DO TMDL Project. These nitrogen species are important nutrients in phytoplankton growth which is a principal oxygen-consuming material in the Stockton’s DWSC as it dies and decomposes. Additionally, ammonia can consume oxygen as it is oxidized by bacteria. Nitrogen can come from a variety of anthropogenic sources such as commercial fertilizers, animal manures, and point source such as the Stockton Waste Water Treatment Plant. Understanding the sources and fate of different nitrogen species entering the SJR Estuary is a necessary part of the estuary model and solving the low dissolved oxygen problem.

Location

Grave Covell

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Solving the low dissolved oxygen problem by understanding the sources and fate of different nitrogen species entering in the San Joaquin River Estuary

Grave Covell

Stockton’s deepwater ship channel (DWSC) has been suffering from low dissolved oxygen for decades, especially in dry water years. The Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) has been the lead science agency on the Dissolved Oxygen (DO) Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) project since 2005. The purpose of this project is to collect and analyze data on the sources of nutrients, phytoplankton and oxygen-consuming materials in the San Joaquin River (SJR) estuary, the upstream SJR, and upstream tributaries to support the development of an estuary model. This model is needed by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) to provide modeling tools, scientific data and other information to support management actions that will be taken by the Regional Board and stakeholders to resolve the low DO problems in Stockton’s DWSC. For my part in this project, I have been responsible for measuring ammonia, nitrate, and total nitrogen in samples collected in 2011 as part of the DO TMDL Project. These nitrogen species are important nutrients in phytoplankton growth which is a principal oxygen-consuming material in the Stockton’s DWSC as it dies and decomposes. Additionally, ammonia can consume oxygen as it is oxidized by bacteria. Nitrogen can come from a variety of anthropogenic sources such as commercial fertilizers, animal manures, and point source such as the Stockton Waste Water Treatment Plant. Understanding the sources and fate of different nitrogen species entering the SJR Estuary is a necessary part of the estuary model and solving the low dissolved oxygen problem.