Title

Use of a motion-based, novel computer application for whole-plate screening of drugs against small parasitic nematodes

Poster Number

55

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Kirkwood Land

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Gregg Jongeward

Abstract/Artist Statement

One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides has been the lack of a high-throughput screening method for candidate drugs and other chemical libraries. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. Recently, a new, low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement was developed (called Worm Assay). This system was first developed for analysis of larger filarial nematodes such as Brugia malayi. Whether this technology can be adapted for analysis of smaller parasitic worms is unclear. To address this, we have begun to adapt the Worm Assay using C. elegans as a model nematode for analyzing drugs in a high throughput method. Conditions for successfully culturing nematodes in suspension in 96-well plates and for analyzing their motion in the presence and absence of common anthelmintics are underway. The successful use of the Worm Assay with C. elegans should help to identify potential new chemotherapies for a variety of smaller parasitic nematodes.

Location

Grave Covell

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Use of a motion-based, novel computer application for whole-plate screening of drugs against small parasitic nematodes

Grave Covell

One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides has been the lack of a high-throughput screening method for candidate drugs and other chemical libraries. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. Recently, a new, low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement was developed (called Worm Assay). This system was first developed for analysis of larger filarial nematodes such as Brugia malayi. Whether this technology can be adapted for analysis of smaller parasitic worms is unclear. To address this, we have begun to adapt the Worm Assay using C. elegans as a model nematode for analyzing drugs in a high throughput method. Conditions for successfully culturing nematodes in suspension in 96-well plates and for analyzing their motion in the presence and absence of common anthelmintics are underway. The successful use of the Worm Assay with C. elegans should help to identify potential new chemotherapies for a variety of smaller parasitic nematodes.