Title

Pediatric Trainer: Giving Children a Helping Hand

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Pediatric Trainer device is designed to be an add-on to a body-powered, voluntary-close pediatric arm prosthetic that will help children learn to use their prostheses faster. It will give auditory feedback based on the amount of force exerted by the toddler. The inspiration behind this design is Michael Haag, who was born without a fully developed left hand (unilateral congenital below-the-elbow deficiency); he started attending therapy sessions when he was just over a year old to learn how to use his body-powered voluntary-close prosthetic arm. These therapy sessions are short and sporadic throughout the year; therefore Michael does not receive constant reinforcement of how to use his new and unfamiliar prosthetic device. Although Michael Haag is the motivation behind the design of this product, it will ultimately be marketed to toddlers and young children, specifically ages 2-4 years old, who use body-powered voluntary- close arm prosthetics.The add-on consists of a strain gauge mounted on a u-shaped aluminum mount, which is attached in-line to the cable on the terminal end of the prosthetic device. The strain gauge is connected into a circuit to produce a voltage output, which is then converted from an analogue signal to a digital signal. An FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) chip is used to activate a specific sound chip according to the strain measured. The sound chip will then play a pre-recorded voice segment giving the child constant positive feedback when they use their prosthetic device; thereby aiding in the learning process of the toddler.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

1-5-2010 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2010 3:30 PM

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:30 PM

Pediatric Trainer: Giving Children a Helping Hand

School of Engineering & Computer Science

The Pediatric Trainer device is designed to be an add-on to a body-powered, voluntary-close pediatric arm prosthetic that will help children learn to use their prostheses faster. It will give auditory feedback based on the amount of force exerted by the toddler. The inspiration behind this design is Michael Haag, who was born without a fully developed left hand (unilateral congenital below-the-elbow deficiency); he started attending therapy sessions when he was just over a year old to learn how to use his body-powered voluntary-close prosthetic arm. These therapy sessions are short and sporadic throughout the year; therefore Michael does not receive constant reinforcement of how to use his new and unfamiliar prosthetic device. Although Michael Haag is the motivation behind the design of this product, it will ultimately be marketed to toddlers and young children, specifically ages 2-4 years old, who use body-powered voluntary- close arm prosthetics.The add-on consists of a strain gauge mounted on a u-shaped aluminum mount, which is attached in-line to the cable on the terminal end of the prosthetic device. The strain gauge is connected into a circuit to produce a voltage output, which is then converted from an analogue signal to a digital signal. An FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) chip is used to activate a specific sound chip according to the strain measured. The sound chip will then play a pre-recorded voice segment giving the child constant positive feedback when they use their prosthetic device; thereby aiding in the learning process of the toddler.