Title

Perception of Homosexual Marriage Based on Clothing Styles

Poster Number

12

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

This study explored whether appearance (e.g. clothes) of homosexual couples had a positive or negative effect on societal perceptions. In general, non-traditional relationships (interracial marriages, same-sex marriages, or a younger woman having a relationship with an older man) have had negative perceptions from individuals who value traditional relationships (i.e. relationships between same ethnicity and heterosexual couples) (Lehmiller & Agnew, 2005). Lehmiller and Agnew (2005) suggested that gay and lesbian marriages have appeared to be less favorable: only 27% of participants supported same-sex marriages. The current study expanded on Horn (2005) examined high school student’s acceptance of homosexual peers, based on whether the individual was conventional or nonconventional in mannerisms, appearance, and activities. After a questionnaire was dispersed to students, Horn (2005) suggested that students who did not follow appearance norms were rated as less acceptable than peers who broke activity norms. The current study hypothesized that people walking by will more likely take a pamphlet supporting homosexual marriage when the background poster is of a sophisticated, traditional homosexual couple (i.e. a couple wearing tuxedos) as compared to a stereotypical, more flamboyant couple. To do so, this field study consisted of 200 participants, who were chosen if they were walking in front of the DeRosa University Center at the University of the Pacific. Data was collected by comparing the amount of pamphlets offered, to the amount actually taken. A one-way ANOVA was then used to interpret the results

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

1-5-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Perception of Homosexual Marriage Based on Clothing Styles

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

This study explored whether appearance (e.g. clothes) of homosexual couples had a positive or negative effect on societal perceptions. In general, non-traditional relationships (interracial marriages, same-sex marriages, or a younger woman having a relationship with an older man) have had negative perceptions from individuals who value traditional relationships (i.e. relationships between same ethnicity and heterosexual couples) (Lehmiller & Agnew, 2005). Lehmiller and Agnew (2005) suggested that gay and lesbian marriages have appeared to be less favorable: only 27% of participants supported same-sex marriages. The current study expanded on Horn (2005) examined high school student’s acceptance of homosexual peers, based on whether the individual was conventional or nonconventional in mannerisms, appearance, and activities. After a questionnaire was dispersed to students, Horn (2005) suggested that students who did not follow appearance norms were rated as less acceptable than peers who broke activity norms. The current study hypothesized that people walking by will more likely take a pamphlet supporting homosexual marriage when the background poster is of a sophisticated, traditional homosexual couple (i.e. a couple wearing tuxedos) as compared to a stereotypical, more flamboyant couple. To do so, this field study consisted of 200 participants, who were chosen if they were walking in front of the DeRosa University Center at the University of the Pacific. Data was collected by comparing the amount of pamphlets offered, to the amount actually taken. A one-way ANOVA was then used to interpret the results