Title

Identification of CeABF-1 interacting proteins in Caenorhabiditis elegans

Poster Number

10

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

The gene CeABF-1 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) transcription factor. The encoded protein is functionally similar to the product of the ABF-1 gene in mammals. The mammalian protein appears to be important during normal development and may also be misexpressed in certain abnormal cells. In order to further understand how this protein works in multicellular organisms, we are studying CeABF-l, in the hope that comparison of the simple nematode to the more complex mammal will elucidate fundamental principles of the function of this gene. As a first step, we are identifying proteins that interact with CeABF-1 using a "two-hybrid" screen. Thus far, we have cloned several possible interaction partners and confirmed the identity of several of these partners. One of the identified interacters is the gene CeE, which encodes the nematode homolog of a well-known ABF-1 partner. Other clones correspond to genes that have not been previously linked to ABF-1 or other bHLH transcription factors. Characterization of these genes may help us to understand how ABF-1 (and CeABF-1) function in normal cells.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Identification of CeABF-1 interacting proteins in Caenorhabiditis elegans

Pacific Geosciences Center

The gene CeABF-1 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) transcription factor. The encoded protein is functionally similar to the product of the ABF-1 gene in mammals. The mammalian protein appears to be important during normal development and may also be misexpressed in certain abnormal cells. In order to further understand how this protein works in multicellular organisms, we are studying CeABF-l, in the hope that comparison of the simple nematode to the more complex mammal will elucidate fundamental principles of the function of this gene. As a first step, we are identifying proteins that interact with CeABF-1 using a "two-hybrid" screen. Thus far, we have cloned several possible interaction partners and confirmed the identity of several of these partners. One of the identified interacters is the gene CeE, which encodes the nematode homolog of a well-known ABF-1 partner. Other clones correspond to genes that have not been previously linked to ABF-1 or other bHLH transcription factors. Characterization of these genes may help us to understand how ABF-1 (and CeABF-1) function in normal cells.