Title

The effect of magnetic insoles on vertical jump in male collegiate volleyball players.

Poster Number

22

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of magnetic insoles on power output as measured by vertical jump in 15 male collegiate volleyball players (age=19.87±1.64yrs., ht=74.93±5.02 in., wt=84.39±10.83kg.). Subjects arrived at the testing site and were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: Nikken, Inc. Magstrides TM magnetic insoles (mg) and placebo insoles (pi). Study participants and researchers were both blinded to the testing condition. Subjects warmed up on a cycle ergometer for ten minutes before performing three standing vertical jumps with 20 seconds rest between jumps. Weight, height, standing reach, jump reach (Vertec TM), and vertical jump were recorded. Subjects were then given.l5 minutes rest before repesting the process under the other condition. One sample t-tests revealed no differences between conditions in peak vertical jump (p=.601; mg=27.13±2.79 in., pl=26.77±2.65 in.), average vertical jump (p=.920; mg=26.39±2.59 in., pl=26.32±2.52 in.), or peak power.output (p=.872; mg=146.84±20.11 kg-m/sec, pl=145.98±19.43 kg-m/sec). From our findings, we conclude that magnetic insoles have no effect on power output as measured by vertical jump in male collegiate volleyball players.

Location

DeRosa University Center

Start Date

1-5-2001 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2001 5:00 PM

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 5:00 PM

The effect of magnetic insoles on vertical jump in male collegiate volleyball players.

DeRosa University Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of magnetic insoles on power output as measured by vertical jump in 15 male collegiate volleyball players (age=19.87±1.64yrs., ht=74.93±5.02 in., wt=84.39±10.83kg.). Subjects arrived at the testing site and were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: Nikken, Inc. Magstrides TM magnetic insoles (mg) and placebo insoles (pi). Study participants and researchers were both blinded to the testing condition. Subjects warmed up on a cycle ergometer for ten minutes before performing three standing vertical jumps with 20 seconds rest between jumps. Weight, height, standing reach, jump reach (Vertec TM), and vertical jump were recorded. Subjects were then given.l5 minutes rest before repesting the process under the other condition. One sample t-tests revealed no differences between conditions in peak vertical jump (p=.601; mg=27.13±2.79 in., pl=26.77±2.65 in.), average vertical jump (p=.920; mg=26.39±2.59 in., pl=26.32±2.52 in.), or peak power.output (p=.872; mg=146.84±20.11 kg-m/sec, pl=145.98±19.43 kg-m/sec). From our findings, we conclude that magnetic insoles have no effect on power output as measured by vertical jump in male collegiate volleyball players.