Title

Opicapone for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease "Off" Episodes: Pharmacology and Clinical Considerations

ORCiD

Adam M. Kaye: 0000-0002-7224-3322

Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Clinical drug investigation

ISSN

1179-1918

Volume

42

Issue

2

DOI

10.1007/s40261-021-01109-3

First Page

127

Last Page

135

Publication Date

2-1-2022

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. It is also the fastest-growing neurodegenerative disorder and has more than doubled between 1990 and 2016. Parkinson's disease causes significant morbidity and disability from motor dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. This paper reviews recent evidence in the treatment of PD "off" episodes with the novel drug opicapone, including its efficacy, safety, and clinical indications. Opicapone is a novel, peripherally acting catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor used as adjunctive therapy to carbidopa/levodopa for treatment and prevention of "off" episodes. It has been approved for use as an adjunct to levodopa since 2016 in Europe and has recently (April 2020) gained FDA approval for use in the USA. By inhibiting COMT, opicapone slows levodopa metabolism and increases its availability. Several clinical studies demonstrated significant improvement in treatment efficacy and reduction in the duration of "off" episodes The main side effect demonstrated was dyskinesia, mostly with the 100 mg dose, which is higher than the approved, effective dose of 50 mg.

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