Creator

R[obert] U[nderwood] Johnson

Recipient

John Muir

Transcription

March 8th, 1897

R. W. GILDER, EDITOR.

R. U. JOHNSON,

ASSOCIATE EDITOR.

C. C. BUEL,

ASSISTANT EDITOR.

My dear Muir:-

I went down to Washington for inauguration week - not especially to see the inauguration, but to give Mrs. Johnson and myself a rest. As it was, I succeeded in getting into the midst of the fight for forest preservation. The cow-boy Senators tacked a rider on to the Sundry Civil Bill, throwing all of them open to settlement again, except those in California, the Senators from your State having objected to giving up the California reserves, knowing that the State of California was strongly in favor of the reservation policy. Upon hearing of this rider, the President sent word to the Conference Committee on the Sundry [illegible] Bill that if it remained in the bill he would not sign it! Meantime, for fear that it might be passed over his veto, Secretary Francis and Mr. Lacey of the Public Lands Committee arranged a substitute, which was adopted by the House, and afterward by the Senate, making concessions in the matter of timber-cutting arid mining. But even with this change in the bill (which was not so bad, although we should have preferred not to make it) the President pocketed the bill on account of ether objectionable

02254

J. M. 2.

K. W. GILDER, EDITOR.

R. U. JOHNSON,
ASSOCIATE EDITOR.

C. C. BUBL,
ASSISTANT EDITOR.

things in it, so that at the present moment the reservations stand. But there are evidences that a great onslaught will be made upon McKinley at once, and the Forest Commission and its friends are organizing here. Of course, first of all we must have Western support. Can you not have the Sierra Club at once endorse the action of Senators Perkins and White in insisting that the California reservations should not be annulled. If this could have a preamble to the effect that the State of California is overwhelmingly in favor of the reservation system, it would very much help us in supporting it in other states. I wish you could have a lot of letters written to Perkins and White asking them to fight for the reservations in other states, for any amendment that may be carried will apply to the old reservations as well as to the new.
I am writing to other Western people to-day, but we must rely on you to organize our friends in California.
A letter to McKinley for [illegible]

Faithfully [illegible]

[illegible]

John Muir, Esq.
Martinez, Cal.

02254

Location

New York

Date Original

1897 Mar 8

Source

Original letter dimensions: 27 x 21 cm.

Resource Identifier

muir09_0777-let.tif

File Identifier

Reel 09, Image 0777

Copyright Statement

Some letters written to John Muir may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by copyright beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.

Owning Institution

University of the Pacific Library Holt-Atherton Special Collections. Please contact this institution directly to obtain copies of the images or permission to publish or use them beyond educational purposes.

Pages

2 pages

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