University of the Pacific

 

Event Title

Microfluidic Platforms for Biological and Pharmaceutical Applications

Location

Biology Building, Room 101

Start Date

22-3-2018 6:00 PM

End Date

22-3-2018 7:00 PM

Description

Recently, there has been a large emphasis on miniaturization of devices for a multitude of applications, including biomedical technologies, due to the many advantages of operating on this scale. In addition to the inherent benefit of a fully functioning device that can be held in one hand, these microfluidic devices only require small biological samples, which can be often difficult to obtain, and can be built inexpensively. Perhaps most importantly, flow and mass transport behavior diverge from what typically occurs at larger scales and produce a highly controllable and reproducible fluidic environment in both local flow and chemical concentration. The small lengths and volumes also promote faster mass transfer, enabling micro-designs capable of performing highly sensitive and rapid analyses. Studies of the fundamental fluid flow are essential to the development of optimized microdevices. In my work, I explore the interrelationship of mass transport and fluid flow in order to understand how the behavior can be harnessed in microfluidic platforms for biological and pharmaceutical applications.

Speaker Bio

Shelly Gulati is an Associate Professor and the Chair of Bioengineering at the University of the Pacific. She obtained a B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Universities of California, Berkeley and San Francisco . She also completed postdoctoral training at Imperial College London . Professor Gulati studies fluid flow and mass transport on the microscale. Her interest is to utilize the unique flow environment to enable new platforms and tools that fully exploit the physics at this scale. Underlying her efforts is a deep interest in advancing medical diagnostics, disease treatment, and human health conditions.

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Mar 22nd, 6:00 PM Mar 22nd, 7:00 PM

Microfluidic Platforms for Biological and Pharmaceutical Applications

Biology Building, Room 101

Recently, there has been a large emphasis on miniaturization of devices for a multitude of applications, including biomedical technologies, due to the many advantages of operating on this scale. In addition to the inherent benefit of a fully functioning device that can be held in one hand, these microfluidic devices only require small biological samples, which can be often difficult to obtain, and can be built inexpensively. Perhaps most importantly, flow and mass transport behavior diverge from what typically occurs at larger scales and produce a highly controllable and reproducible fluidic environment in both local flow and chemical concentration. The small lengths and volumes also promote faster mass transfer, enabling micro-designs capable of performing highly sensitive and rapid analyses. Studies of the fundamental fluid flow are essential to the development of optimized microdevices. In my work, I explore the interrelationship of mass transport and fluid flow in order to understand how the behavior can be harnessed in microfluidic platforms for biological and pharmaceutical applications.