Abstract Title

Association between oral microbiota and systemic health

Lead Author Affiliation

DDS student/ University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry

Lead Author Status

DDS Year 1

Expected Graduation Date

2021

Presentation Category

Literature Review

Introduction/Context/Diagnosis

The relationship between oral health and systemic disease likely varies as a function of the individual's condition, genetics, and general environment. Nevertheless, recent evidence suggests that microbes in the mouth have a large effect on overall health, which was previously underestimated.

Methods/Treatment Plan

A systematic PubMed search was performed for articles published in the past three years on the relationship between oral microbiome and systemic diseases.

Results/Outcome

We found a relatively small number of articles that describe the effects of oral microbiome on systemic diseases (as opposed to the larger number of articles on the effects of oral pathogens on oral health or systemic health). Most of these articles described an effect of the oral microbiome on oral cancer, diabetes, brain physiology, or pregnancy.

Significance/Conclusions

We conclude that commensals in the mouth produce metabolites that could contribute to nutrition, metabolic functions, stimulation of the immune system, and overall physiological functions. We speculate that pathogens in the mouth, by inducing inflammation, could have systemic effects indirectly.

Format

Event

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Association between oral microbiota and systemic health

The relationship between oral health and systemic disease likely varies as a function of the individual's condition, genetics, and general environment. Nevertheless, recent evidence suggests that microbes in the mouth have a large effect on overall health, which was previously underestimated.