Title

The Music Attentiveness Screening Assessment, Revised (MASA-R): A Study of Technical Adequacy

Poster Number

5

Lead Author Affiliation

Conservatory of Music - Music Therapy

Introduction

Recent evidence suggests that attention is an important consideration when designing distraction-based interventions for children undergoing invasive medical procedures. Therefore, it would seem important for music therapists to assess the extent to which children can attend to musical stimuli when designing procedural support interventions. Recently, Waldon and Broadhurst (2014) evaluated the technical adequacy of the Music Attentiveness Screening Assessment (MASA; Wolfe & Waldon, 2009). They found that MASA measured, in part, the construct of auditory attention; however, they recommended several administrative revisions before using the tool in the clinical setting.

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the technical adequacy of a revised version of MASA (MASA-R) by addressing the following research questions: (a) To what extent does MASA-R measure the construct of auditory attention? (b) To what extent do MASA-R scores evidence test-retest reliability? and (c) What is the interobserver reliability of MASA-R when administered by independent examiners? Further analysis involved exploring performance differences by age group, gender, familiarity (with the musical selection), or liking/disliking (of the musical selection).

Method

Informed by the results of the previous study, both administrative and scoring changes were applied to the original measure. In the previous study, it was noted that the response mode between MASA and the comparator instrument (auditory attention [AA]) differed significantly, thereby confounding estimates of attention. In the revised tool, examinees were directed to “point to” as opposed to “place/hold aloft” visual stimuli in response to musical cues. Secondly, as the inherent structure of music anticipates targeted musical events (e.g., a repeating melody line or cadence), the definition of a correct response on MASA-R was expanded to include any “pointing response” occurring immediately before the designated musical cue. This non-clinical sample consisted of 33 children (19 female) ages 5 to 9 years (M = 7.25 years, SD = 1.17 years). In accordance with the investigators’ Institutional Review Board’s guidelines, study recruitment involved approaching parents or an organization’s intermediary (e.g., school administrator) to inform them about the study. After parents or guardians agreed to allow participation, signed consent and assent forms were obtained and data collection began. During testing, participants were seated at a table in a quiet area and administered both MASA-R items and the AA comparator test. Using a random number generator, the investigators counterbalanced the sequence of administration to account for order effects. All participants were assessed two weeks later (M = 13.58 days, SD = 1 day). A systematically drawn sub sample (n = 26) was also subjected to interobserver analysis.

Results

Preliminary analysis of this ongoing study indicates that a statistically significant proportion of score variance is shared by MASA-R and AA, R2 = .30, F(2, 30) = 6.41, p = .005. Zero-order correlations suggested that Item I shares a significant proportion of variance with AA (r2 = .36, p = .001) while Item II does not (r2 = .06, p = .08). Test-retest reliability using Pearson’s product-moment correlation fell into the moderate range for both MASA-R items (Item I, r = .58; Item II, r = .59). Interobserver agreement was acceptable for both items (Item I, ICC = .90; Item II, ICC = .85). Analyses of performance by age group, gender, familiarity, and like/dislike yielded no statistically significant results.

Significance

Estimates of MASA-R’s construct validity and interobserver agreement appear improved over its predecessor (MASA). However, test-retest reliability estimates did not meet those evidenced in the previous study. One explanation may be the presence of practice effects because the majority of examinees evidenced an improved performance on the second administration. Further study, including the administration of MASA-R to a clinical sample, are needed before adoption of this tool in the pediatric setting.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Format

Poster Presentation

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

The Music Attentiveness Screening Assessment, Revised (MASA-R): A Study of Technical Adequacy

DeRosa University Center, Stockton campus, University of the Pacific

Recent evidence suggests that attention is an important consideration when designing distraction-based interventions for children undergoing invasive medical procedures. Therefore, it would seem important for music therapists to assess the extent to which children can attend to musical stimuli when designing procedural support interventions. Recently, Waldon and Broadhurst (2014) evaluated the technical adequacy of the Music Attentiveness Screening Assessment (MASA; Wolfe & Waldon, 2009). They found that MASA measured, in part, the construct of auditory attention; however, they recommended several administrative revisions before using the tool in the clinical setting.