Date of Award

1981

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Roger L. Reimer

First Committee Member

Erling A. Erickson

Second Committee Member

Frank Ciriza

Third Committee Member

William P. Bacon

Fourth Committee Member

George Gustafson

Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of administrative pre-service training under Ryan Act programs. The study was concerned specifically with (1) determining the competencies considered most important by principals, (2) determining the adequacy of training on identified competencies, (3) determining if principals from the elementary, junior high, and high school levels had different competency needs, and (4) determining if principals from the elementary, junior high, and high school levels view the adequacy of their training differently. Procedure. A survey instrument containing thirty-seven competencies organized into six general categories was developed through a review of the literature. The survey instrument was examined to determine its reliability and validity. The respondent was to rate the importance of each competency and the adequacy of the training received on that competency. The survey instrument was sent to 113 principals who had received their administrative credential through a Ryan Act program. Findings. A total of 74 percent of the surveys were returned. Of the thirty-seven competencies, fourteen competencies scored below a mid-point score of 3.0 on a five point scale indicating that the principals did not feel adequately trained on those specific competencies. The results of an ANOVA showed that there was no significant difference on how principals from the elementary, junior high, and high school levels perceived the importance of each category or the adequacy of the training they received. The principals surveyed indicated that all competencies were important, but that those in the category of leadership were the most important. On adequacy of training the principals indicated that governance and legal processes was the category in which they felt most adequately trained. Conclusions. (1) The competencies listed in the study present a reasonably comprehensive perspective of the principal's role. (2) Principals felt adequately trained to perform the competencies of their position. (3) There appears to be no significant difference between principals from the elementary, junior high, and high school levels as to the importance of competencies used in this study. (4) There appears to be no significant difference between principals from the elementary, junior high, and high school levels as to the adequacy of training they received on the competencies used in this study. Recommendations. (1) This study should be repeated in approximately five years when a greater number of respondents should be available to participate. (2) Recommendations for program improvement should be field tested at an institution of higher education with a follow-up study made of the program graduates. (3) A study should be made to determine the best time and method for delivery of administrative competencies.

Pages

142

Included in

Education Commons

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