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Date of Award

1995

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Gary N. Howells

First Committee Member

Douglas W. Matheson

Second Committee Member

Roger G. Katz

Abstract

This study investigated two different training schedules for a stress management course offered to 36 child care workers. The study included three groups, a massed training group, distributed training group, and an untreated control group. Based on learning theory as presented in the paper, it was hypothesized that the distributed format (1 hour per week for 8 weeks) would yield greater changes in reported stress than would the massed format (4 hours in 2 sessions) or the wait-list control. Results indicated that statistically the training was effective in changing the number of hours absent from work, that the distributed format was superior to the massed in changing number of hours absent from work, and that the massed format was preferred by participants. Trends further tended toward support for the hypothesis that the distributed format would be more effective, particularly with the Emotional Exhaustion pre-/post-training scores. Critique and suggestions for further study are included in this paper.

Pages

87

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