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Date of Award

1991

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Graduate Studies

First Advisor

John L. G. Boelter

First Committee Member

J. Connor Sutton

Second Committee Member

Kenneth L. Beauchamp

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fatigue on the accuracy and selected biomechanic variables of jump shot performance. Five subjects were filmed with two high speed cine cameras during pre-fatigue and post-fatigue conditions. The accuracy data were acquired by recording the results of thirty pre-fatigue and thirty post-fatigue, fifteen foot jump shots. The biomechanical data were gathered from film records of every third trial in the pre-fatigue and post-fatigue shooting. Biomechanical analysis variables were acquired using a ten point body model. With these data the following biomechanical variables were analyzed in the pre-fatigue and post-fatigue condition: (1) height of release (2) angle of release (3) absolute shoulder flexion angle at release, and (4) angle of shoulder abduction.

Results of the study showed that there is no decrease in accuracy of jump shot performance after fatigue. Fatigue slightly effects the height of release in jump shot performance. Fatigue does not decrease the angle of release in jump shot performance. Fatigue does cause a decrease in the shoulder angle in jump shot performance. There is no decrease in shoulder abduction after fatigue . The study also showed that there are apparently many biomechanical techniques in high percentage shooters, and the presence of fatigue affects selected jump shot biomechanics differently in each shooter.

Pages

82

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