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Date of Award

1981

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

Raymond L. M. [?]

First Committee Member

Wallace F. C[?]

Second Committee Member

Walt R[?]

Abstract

While this study purports to offer nothing new or original to the enormous body of research pertaining to Nazism, the purpose of this thesis is to provide an examination of the political core contained in this particular ideology. The components of National Socialism and their ultimate effect on Germany will be the major focus of this thesis. Nazism, as a political ideology, was an extreme force that shook the foundations of the twentieth-century world.

After an intensive survey of the literature in this field, the author realized that little could be added. The objective, here, is to examine the historical roots from which Nazism developed, its ideological core, and its effect upon the German state.

Pages

191

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