Event Title

Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy Graduate Student Research Showcase

Document Type

Panel

Start Date

10-11-2020 4:00 PM

End Date

10-11-2020 5:00 PM

Description

Title: Descriptive Analysis of COVID-19 Treatment Strategies at a Veteran Affairs Health Care System (Presented by Anika Patel)

Abstract: Proposed treatment options for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 presently include various antimicrobials, immunomodulators, and blood-derived products, with no specific drug showing more efficacy than others. The primary outcome was the proportion of hospitalized patients receiving pharmacotherapy for COVID-19, with a descriptive analysis of the types of pharmacotherapy received. This was a retrospective descriptive analysis of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at Veteran Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) from March 25 to October 2, 2020. Patients were included if they had a positive SARS-CoV-2 test and were treated as inpatient for COVID-19. Data was collected from electronic medical records and included: demographics, comorbidities, chronic medications, hospital and ICU stay, mortality, symptoms at admission, laboratory findings, radiographic imaging, and pharmacotherapy. Over a 6-month period, inpatient treatment of COVID-19 at VAPAHCS varied extensively. Overall, patients who presented with less severe disease tended to receive standard of care while patients who presented with more severe disease tended to receive pharmaceutical intervention. While many different therapeutic strategies were utilized in the treatment of COVID-19, no one treatment showed more benefit compared to another.

Title: Outcomes of Patients on Convalescent Plasma Monotherapy versus Convalescent Plasma with Remdesivir (Presented by Edward Liang)

Abstract: Since the onset of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many experimental therapies have been investigated. Remdesivir has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in hospitalized patients. However, data regarding convalescent plasma as monotherapy or in combination with remdesivir is still inconclusive. Patients who received convalescent plasma monotherapy did not have a significant difference in clinical outcomes compared to those who received convalescent plasma with remdesivir. The limitations of this study include the significant difference in baseline age between the two groups, small sample size, and other confounding variables that the statistical tests did not account for. Further studies regarding the efficacy of convalescent plasma should be conducted.


Title: Characterization of Clinical Interventions in an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Clinic and Associated Cost Avoidance (Presented by Liann Hoang)

Abstract: Geriatric patients often have multiple comorbidities and receive care from various providers which increases their risk of experiencing medication related problems (MRPs). MRPs can result in increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare spending. Collaborative care delivery models that include clinical pharmacists can decrease MRPs including drug-drug interactions (DDIs), adverse drug events (ADE), and inappropriate dosing. The objective of this study is to characterize MRPs identified in patients seen in an interdisciplinary geriatrics clinic and assess the associated cost-avoidance of interventions. A retrospective chart review study was conducted on all patients seen in the interdisciplinary geriatric clinic at San Joaquin General Hospital from June 1, 2020 to August 30, 2020. There were no exclusion criteria. The primary outcomes were the frequency and types of MRPs identified and the interventions made by the clinic team. The secondary outcome included the cost avoidance associated with the interventions which was calculated using a published cost-avoidance model. An interdisciplinary health care team in a geriatric referral clinic identified a variety of MRPs and made clinically significant interventions which translated to considerable cost avoidance. This study serves as preliminary data on potential impact of the clinic. The collaborative, interdisciplinary team approach to geriatric healthcare delivery can result in improved patient outcomes and should be further studied.

Speaker Bio

Anika Patel

Anika is a Doctor of Pharmacy candidate at the University of the Pacific, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy, expected to graduate in May 2021. She obtained a B.S. in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics from the University of California Los Angeles. Upon completion of her PharmD, she plans to pursue a PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences, with an end goal of working in research and development at a pharmaceutical company. Her current research interests include drug delivery systems, biotechnology in the realm of pharmaceuticals, and infectious disease. Her leadership roles at UOP included acting as the Director of Communications on the executive board for the Industry Pharmacists Organization (IPhO), a Project Manager for the Mental Health Awareness Committee, and the Presenter for the Admission Committee for the pharmacy school.

Edward Liang

Edward is a 3rd year pharmacy student who is pursuing a Pharm.D. degree at Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy. Originally from Stockton, he started his education at University of the Pacific as a 2+3 pre-pharm and has continued his rotations in the Stockton area. His current work is based in San Joaquin General Hospital and focuses on the patient population they serve. In his free time, Edward enjoys being outdoors, taking road trips throughout California, and searching for plant species in their natural habitat.

Liann Hoang

Liann is currently a third-year pharmacy student at the University of the Pacific, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy. Prior to attending pharmacy school in 2018, she earned her bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences at the University of California, Davis in 2016. During her gap years, she explored various healthcare fields through volunteer and job opportunities before deciding to pursue a career in pharmacy. Throughout didactics, Liann served as Vice President for the Student College of Clinical Pharmacy Organization and worked as a pharmacy intern in the oncology clinic at Kaiser Permanente in Modesto. Now into her final year of pharmacy school, she is currently completing her advance clinical rotations at various sites in the Stockton region. Upon completion of the program, Liann hopes to gain acceptance into a PGY-1 ambulatory care residency program. During her free time, she enjoys baking with her family and running. Fun fact, she was able to complete the San Francisco Hot Chocolate 15K marathon at the beginning of the year.


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Nov 10th, 4:00 PM Nov 10th, 5:00 PM

Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy Graduate Student Research Showcase

Title: Descriptive Analysis of COVID-19 Treatment Strategies at a Veteran Affairs Health Care System (Presented by Anika Patel)

Abstract: Proposed treatment options for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 presently include various antimicrobials, immunomodulators, and blood-derived products, with no specific drug showing more efficacy than others. The primary outcome was the proportion of hospitalized patients receiving pharmacotherapy for COVID-19, with a descriptive analysis of the types of pharmacotherapy received. This was a retrospective descriptive analysis of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at Veteran Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) from March 25 to October 2, 2020. Patients were included if they had a positive SARS-CoV-2 test and were treated as inpatient for COVID-19. Data was collected from electronic medical records and included: demographics, comorbidities, chronic medications, hospital and ICU stay, mortality, symptoms at admission, laboratory findings, radiographic imaging, and pharmacotherapy. Over a 6-month period, inpatient treatment of COVID-19 at VAPAHCS varied extensively. Overall, patients who presented with less severe disease tended to receive standard of care while patients who presented with more severe disease tended to receive pharmaceutical intervention. While many different therapeutic strategies were utilized in the treatment of COVID-19, no one treatment showed more benefit compared to another.

Title: Outcomes of Patients on Convalescent Plasma Monotherapy versus Convalescent Plasma with Remdesivir (Presented by Edward Liang)

Abstract: Since the onset of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many experimental therapies have been investigated. Remdesivir has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in hospitalized patients. However, data regarding convalescent plasma as monotherapy or in combination with remdesivir is still inconclusive. Patients who received convalescent plasma monotherapy did not have a significant difference in clinical outcomes compared to those who received convalescent plasma with remdesivir. The limitations of this study include the significant difference in baseline age between the two groups, small sample size, and other confounding variables that the statistical tests did not account for. Further studies regarding the efficacy of convalescent plasma should be conducted.


Title: Characterization of Clinical Interventions in an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Clinic and Associated Cost Avoidance (Presented by Liann Hoang)

Abstract: Geriatric patients often have multiple comorbidities and receive care from various providers which increases their risk of experiencing medication related problems (MRPs). MRPs can result in increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare spending. Collaborative care delivery models that include clinical pharmacists can decrease MRPs including drug-drug interactions (DDIs), adverse drug events (ADE), and inappropriate dosing. The objective of this study is to characterize MRPs identified in patients seen in an interdisciplinary geriatrics clinic and assess the associated cost-avoidance of interventions. A retrospective chart review study was conducted on all patients seen in the interdisciplinary geriatric clinic at San Joaquin General Hospital from June 1, 2020 to August 30, 2020. There were no exclusion criteria. The primary outcomes were the frequency and types of MRPs identified and the interventions made by the clinic team. The secondary outcome included the cost avoidance associated with the interventions which was calculated using a published cost-avoidance model. An interdisciplinary health care team in a geriatric referral clinic identified a variety of MRPs and made clinically significant interventions which translated to considerable cost avoidance. This study serves as preliminary data on potential impact of the clinic. The collaborative, interdisciplinary team approach to geriatric healthcare delivery can result in improved patient outcomes and should be further studied.

https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/research-tuesdays/fall-2020/events/12