Title

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Gardening Therapy Across Different Subgroups

Poster Number

18A

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation (Research Day, April 30)

Faculty Mentor Name

Marylou Bagus-Hansen

Faculty Mentor Department

Undergraduate Education

Abstract/Artist Statement

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, many people’s mental health has been negatively impacted and additional barriers for those who already suffer from mental illness or drug abuse problems have been created, making it harder to receive proper help and treatment. Therapeutic horticulture is a nature-based program that includes a range of outside activities, such as gardening, to promote one’s overall well-being by implementing a person-centered approach that can reduce social isolation especially for those with mental health problems. Previous research has shown that horticulture therapy is an effective way of improving one’s mental health by reducing participants' levels of depression, stress, and anxiety. Communities that would especially benefit from horticulture therapy according to the existing literature include military veterans, students, and those diagnosed with clinical depression or anxiety. The purpose of this study is to investigate if certain populations are able to benefit more from gardening in general by implementing a survey using a Likert scale to assess participants' affect or emotions after participating in gardening sessions. This survey will focus particularly on seeing if gardening is able to reduce feelings of stress, depression, and anxiety in each population. For if left untreated, mental health issues may have a significant impact on one’s physical health and quality of life as well as have societal impacts.

Location

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Gardening Therapy Across Different Subgroups

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, many people’s mental health has been negatively impacted and additional barriers for those who already suffer from mental illness or drug abuse problems have been created, making it harder to receive proper help and treatment. Therapeutic horticulture is a nature-based program that includes a range of outside activities, such as gardening, to promote one’s overall well-being by implementing a person-centered approach that can reduce social isolation especially for those with mental health problems. Previous research has shown that horticulture therapy is an effective way of improving one’s mental health by reducing participants' levels of depression, stress, and anxiety. Communities that would especially benefit from horticulture therapy according to the existing literature include military veterans, students, and those diagnosed with clinical depression or anxiety. The purpose of this study is to investigate if certain populations are able to benefit more from gardening in general by implementing a survey using a Likert scale to assess participants' affect or emotions after participating in gardening sessions. This survey will focus particularly on seeing if gardening is able to reduce feelings of stress, depression, and anxiety in each population. For if left untreated, mental health issues may have a significant impact on one’s physical health and quality of life as well as have societal impacts.