Title

Widespread use of 3D In-Vitro Models in Viral Diseases

Poster Number

11A

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation (Research Day, April 30)

Faculty Mentor Name

Maria Gencogolu

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Shelly Gulati

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

This Research provides an overview of the applications and overall challenges of creating 3D-In Vitro models to promote their use in studying viral diseases. 3D models are developed by integrating cells into various types of biomaterials, such as synthetic hydrogels (i.e., polyethylene glycol) and natural hydrogels (i.e, collagen). Some of these models use innovative bioreactors, such as the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV). Developments in biomaterials have helped researchers solve various challenges when imitating the cellular matrix, polarity, and differentiation of pluripotent cells found in the human body (in-vivo). Structural biomaterials, or scaffolds, provide structural support for cell growth, attachment and migration, mimicking the extracellular environment (ECM) the cell would experience in-vivo. Moreover, growth and signal factors must also be considered to ensure the cells differentiate and proliferate properly. Once the in-vitro model has been created, it is compared with organs/ physiological environments visible in-vivo, then infected with a virus and analyzed through immunohistochemistry. Effective infection and biomimicry indicate successful 3D-models, which can be used to test various drugs/treatments.

Although 3D-models provide information that current 2D-monolayer and animal models cannot, 3D-models should not be an alternative to those methods. This research instead advocates for the widespread use of 3D-models as an additional platform for drug/treatment testing. With more helpful ways of testing, medical professionals may no longer have to settle for developing an effective treatment. Rather, it may encourage and permit pursuit of a more ambitious goal: a revolutionary cure.

Location

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Widespread use of 3D In-Vitro Models in Viral Diseases

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

This Research provides an overview of the applications and overall challenges of creating 3D-In Vitro models to promote their use in studying viral diseases. 3D models are developed by integrating cells into various types of biomaterials, such as synthetic hydrogels (i.e., polyethylene glycol) and natural hydrogels (i.e, collagen). Some of these models use innovative bioreactors, such as the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV). Developments in biomaterials have helped researchers solve various challenges when imitating the cellular matrix, polarity, and differentiation of pluripotent cells found in the human body (in-vivo). Structural biomaterials, or scaffolds, provide structural support for cell growth, attachment and migration, mimicking the extracellular environment (ECM) the cell would experience in-vivo. Moreover, growth and signal factors must also be considered to ensure the cells differentiate and proliferate properly. Once the in-vitro model has been created, it is compared with organs/ physiological environments visible in-vivo, then infected with a virus and analyzed through immunohistochemistry. Effective infection and biomimicry indicate successful 3D-models, which can be used to test various drugs/treatments.

Although 3D-models provide information that current 2D-monolayer and animal models cannot, 3D-models should not be an alternative to those methods. This research instead advocates for the widespread use of 3D-models as an additional platform for drug/treatment testing. With more helpful ways of testing, medical professionals may no longer have to settle for developing an effective treatment. Rather, it may encourage and permit pursuit of a more ambitious goal: a revolutionary cure.