Title

Binding of Quercetin Derivatives with DNA Oligonucleotide Triplexes and Duplexes

Poster Number

17C

Lead Author Major

Pre-Pharmacy

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Pre-Pharmacy

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation (Research Day, April 30)

Faculty Mentor Name

Liang Xue

Faculty Mentor Department

Chemistry

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Landy Gu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Chemistry

Additional Mentors

Name: Vanessa Rangel

Email: v_rangel1@u.pacific.edu

Chemistry Department

Abstract/Artist Statement

Triplex DNA is an H-form triple-helical structure that is formed through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding in the major groove of the double-helical DNA. The triplex strand has a more lucrative means of binding onto the DNA sequence via the major groove. The DNA repair and replication enzymes cannot recognize the triplex structure; therefore, triplex formation is an anti-gene therapy target that acts as a repressor of DNA replication and gene expression. The formation of triplex DNA is sequence-specific. The third strand is less likely to bind to other sequences in the human genome except at its specified binding site, minimizing the side effects as a potential drug for different infections and diseases. Despite the sequence specificity that makes triplexes attractive for anti-gene therapy, they have a slower formation rate and, under physiological conditions, are less stable than their duplex counterpart. Small molecules have been used to intercalate or act as groove binders to stabilize triplex formation. The natural product quercetin has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic properties. It has been used in many different fields, including the medicinal, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical fields. Its binding to triplex DNA has recently been discovered by our lab. In this study, we further investigate the binding of quercetin derivatives to different DNA oligonucleotide triplexes and duplexes. Based on the data collected, the ligands were successfully bound to and stabilized the triplex DNA complex. The duplex stability remained the same regardless of ligand presence. Results from the thermal denaturation monitored by UV will be presented.

Location

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2022 3:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

Binding of Quercetin Derivatives with DNA Oligonucleotide Triplexes and Duplexes

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Triplex DNA is an H-form triple-helical structure that is formed through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding in the major groove of the double-helical DNA. The triplex strand has a more lucrative means of binding onto the DNA sequence via the major groove. The DNA repair and replication enzymes cannot recognize the triplex structure; therefore, triplex formation is an anti-gene therapy target that acts as a repressor of DNA replication and gene expression. The formation of triplex DNA is sequence-specific. The third strand is less likely to bind to other sequences in the human genome except at its specified binding site, minimizing the side effects as a potential drug for different infections and diseases. Despite the sequence specificity that makes triplexes attractive for anti-gene therapy, they have a slower formation rate and, under physiological conditions, are less stable than their duplex counterpart. Small molecules have been used to intercalate or act as groove binders to stabilize triplex formation. The natural product quercetin has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic properties. It has been used in many different fields, including the medicinal, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical fields. Its binding to triplex DNA has recently been discovered by our lab. In this study, we further investigate the binding of quercetin derivatives to different DNA oligonucleotide triplexes and duplexes. Based on the data collected, the ligands were successfully bound to and stabilized the triplex DNA complex. The duplex stability remained the same regardless of ligand presence. Results from the thermal denaturation monitored by UV will be presented.