Title

Black Kids are being left to die.

Poster Number

17A

Lead Author Major

Political Science

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation (Research Day, April 30)

Faculty Mentor Name

Marylou Bagus-Hansen

Faculty Mentor Department

Undergraduate Education

Abstract/Artist Statement

Our current education system is being held together by a band-aid, and the infection that is ignorance is taking its toll on Black Americans. While there have been a plethora of studies discussing the disparities of health issues within Black communities, an important part often missed is the association between primary education and the long term implications. The goal of this research is to provide insight at the ways in which the lack of quality of K-12 education serves as a precursor for an inability to have full control over the decisions impactful to one's health. At its core the work explores the cycle of “intergenerational poverty,” initially looking at through the lens of Black children in the current education system and the noticeable disparities in public school education. Then following through with analyzing the implications via the parents of said children attending these high poverty schools. Addressing the unique relationship between Black adults and their pursuit of higher education and the consequences that often follow that become erased in the larger crisis of student loan debt. Lastly, piecing this intergenerational poverty all together by looking at the results of a system that perpetuates the impoverished from being able to access the resources in order to remain healthy.

Location

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Black Kids are being left to die.

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Our current education system is being held together by a band-aid, and the infection that is ignorance is taking its toll on Black Americans. While there have been a plethora of studies discussing the disparities of health issues within Black communities, an important part often missed is the association between primary education and the long term implications. The goal of this research is to provide insight at the ways in which the lack of quality of K-12 education serves as a precursor for an inability to have full control over the decisions impactful to one's health. At its core the work explores the cycle of “intergenerational poverty,” initially looking at through the lens of Black children in the current education system and the noticeable disparities in public school education. Then following through with analyzing the implications via the parents of said children attending these high poverty schools. Addressing the unique relationship between Black adults and their pursuit of higher education and the consequences that often follow that become erased in the larger crisis of student loan debt. Lastly, piecing this intergenerational poverty all together by looking at the results of a system that perpetuates the impoverished from being able to access the resources in order to remain healthy.