Title

The Guise of African Independence

Lead Author Major

History

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jeffrey Hole

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Western concept of independence implies that a sovereign nation is in control of its own economy and political decisions. When looking at newly “independent” Post-colonial African states in the mid 20th Century, however, these new nations did not fit under the aforementioned Western interpretation of freedom. This paper explores subsequent forms of continued US and British indirect rule of Africa by analyzing foreign and economic policy. The project comprises two parts. The first is a comparative study focusing on the differences between U.S. and U.K economic foreign policy. This project examines declassified government documents along with US and British newspapers that chronicled the postcolonial conditions of the mid 20th century. The second part of this project explores the African perspective of post-colonialism, by studying the poetry of authors such as p’Bitek Okot, who was well known for his critiques of 1970’s US and European hegemony. Ultimately, this project seeks to examine how the western world remained in control of African governments and economies, while maintaining the guise of African political independence.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 4:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 4:45 PM

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Apr 24th, 4:30 PM Apr 24th, 4:45 PM

The Guise of African Independence

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

The Western concept of independence implies that a sovereign nation is in control of its own economy and political decisions. When looking at newly “independent” Post-colonial African states in the mid 20th Century, however, these new nations did not fit under the aforementioned Western interpretation of freedom. This paper explores subsequent forms of continued US and British indirect rule of Africa by analyzing foreign and economic policy. The project comprises two parts. The first is a comparative study focusing on the differences between U.S. and U.K economic foreign policy. This project examines declassified government documents along with US and British newspapers that chronicled the postcolonial conditions of the mid 20th century. The second part of this project explores the African perspective of post-colonialism, by studying the poetry of authors such as p’Bitek Okot, who was well known for his critiques of 1970’s US and European hegemony. Ultimately, this project seeks to examine how the western world remained in control of African governments and economies, while maintaining the guise of African political independence.