Title

In-vitro Model of Infectious Diseases

Poster Number

9

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Maria Gencogolu

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering, School of Engineering and Computer Science

Abstract/Artist Statement

The coronavirus, the virus that causes Covid-19, is very contagious and it has caused fear across the world: it forced unemployment, shut down social gatherings, and even increased attacks on the Asian community. Currently, the FDA has approved 3 vaccines (BioNTech/Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, and Moderna/NIAID) and one antiviral drug (Remdesivir). However, there is a significant need for models that could help us understand virus infectious disease and develop better vaccines/ treatments. This research focuses on researching and developing an in-vitro (outside a living organism) 3D model of infectious diseases using biomaterials. Certain biomaterials function similarly to the effects of viral diseases and organs; thus, modeling these viral mechanisms can lead to testing of certain treatments or vaccines on specific tissues. Moreover, if a viral in-vitro model was developed, researchers would be able to directly test their drugs continuously on that 3-D model as opposed to a living organism. A non-living test subject can lead to more precise results, and a 3-D model would help researchers see the effects of their drugs on a virus- via biomaterials that mimic that virus- directly. During the research, articles related to in-vitro modeling and infectious diseases are studied and extensive lab work on cell cultures is conducted. In-vitro models can accelerate the development of vaccines and treatments, or even help researchers develop a cure. Challenges include ensuring biomaterials can effectively mimic different strains of microorganisms that cause these infectious diseases.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 2:15 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM Apr 24th, 2:15 PM

In-vitro Model of Infectious Diseases

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

The coronavirus, the virus that causes Covid-19, is very contagious and it has caused fear across the world: it forced unemployment, shut down social gatherings, and even increased attacks on the Asian community. Currently, the FDA has approved 3 vaccines (BioNTech/Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, and Moderna/NIAID) and one antiviral drug (Remdesivir). However, there is a significant need for models that could help us understand virus infectious disease and develop better vaccines/ treatments. This research focuses on researching and developing an in-vitro (outside a living organism) 3D model of infectious diseases using biomaterials. Certain biomaterials function similarly to the effects of viral diseases and organs; thus, modeling these viral mechanisms can lead to testing of certain treatments or vaccines on specific tissues. Moreover, if a viral in-vitro model was developed, researchers would be able to directly test their drugs continuously on that 3-D model as opposed to a living organism. A non-living test subject can lead to more precise results, and a 3-D model would help researchers see the effects of their drugs on a virus- via biomaterials that mimic that virus- directly. During the research, articles related to in-vitro modeling and infectious diseases are studied and extensive lab work on cell cultures is conducted. In-vitro models can accelerate the development of vaccines and treatments, or even help researchers develop a cure. Challenges include ensuring biomaterials can effectively mimic different strains of microorganisms that cause these infectious diseases.