Title

Surgical Stitching Machine Abstract

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

5th year Senior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

5th year Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Bioengineering

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jeff Burmeister

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Health care in the United States on average costs between $500-$1500 a month depending on family sizes; sutures alone will cost the average person without insurance between $300-$700. The designed Surgical Stitch machine will be a medical device that can reduce time restrictions on medical stitches containing a battery controlled stitching mechanism with hopes of creating a portable ability for emergency response services; to prevent unnecessary ambulance rides and to ensure health care provisions for larger lacerations this device would be proven useful. The device alone can provide reliable and efficient use for both patient and medical professionals around the world for stitching and suturing needs. Offering such a device would provide huge health care advantages and progressions in the future. During production, the casing is cut acrylic bound by nuts and screws to ensure the circuit portions are safe from environmental challenges and possible factors that can cause failure. The stitching mechanism, engaging the needle, is made of 3D printed material, brass, aluminum and stainless steel; this part is inserted into the front of the acrylic and attached to the battery powered motor within the acrylic. Once attached to the motor the needle will be propelled forward into the skin activated by a button containing a two second safety between every rotation of the needle in order to reduce risk of tearing the skin. Once the stitch is made on the patient, the mechanism will be discarded and the machine will be ready for the next patient loaded with a new mechanism. Utilizing synthetic skin for testing, the surgical stitch machine is expected to make a continuous stitch across the plane for observation in torque analysis of the needle penetration and the total time of suture completion in hopes of advancing healthcare into a more efficient future.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

1-5-2021 8:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2021 5:00 PM

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May 1st, 8:00 AM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Surgical Stitching Machine Abstract

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Health care in the United States on average costs between $500-$1500 a month depending on family sizes; sutures alone will cost the average person without insurance between $300-$700. The designed Surgical Stitch machine will be a medical device that can reduce time restrictions on medical stitches containing a battery controlled stitching mechanism with hopes of creating a portable ability for emergency response services; to prevent unnecessary ambulance rides and to ensure health care provisions for larger lacerations this device would be proven useful. The device alone can provide reliable and efficient use for both patient and medical professionals around the world for stitching and suturing needs. Offering such a device would provide huge health care advantages and progressions in the future. During production, the casing is cut acrylic bound by nuts and screws to ensure the circuit portions are safe from environmental challenges and possible factors that can cause failure. The stitching mechanism, engaging the needle, is made of 3D printed material, brass, aluminum and stainless steel; this part is inserted into the front of the acrylic and attached to the battery powered motor within the acrylic. Once attached to the motor the needle will be propelled forward into the skin activated by a button containing a two second safety between every rotation of the needle in order to reduce risk of tearing the skin. Once the stitch is made on the patient, the mechanism will be discarded and the machine will be ready for the next patient loaded with a new mechanism. Utilizing synthetic skin for testing, the surgical stitch machine is expected to make a continuous stitch across the plane for observation in torque analysis of the needle penetration and the total time of suture completion in hopes of advancing healthcare into a more efficient future.